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MenuetOS is an example of an OS written entirely in Assembly. Is there any advantage to writing it in Assembly instead of a low-level programming language such as C?

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Not much since C is so low-level, but sometimes you have to "go lower" to hit the hardware. –  Michael Todd Aug 19 '09 at 21:27
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I'm going to go with "masochism" –  Tyler McHenry Aug 19 '09 at 21:27
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'I'm going to go with "masochism".' Na, it 'll put hair on your chest! (Of course this unfortunate if you're a woman, but hey.) –  NoMoreZealots Aug 20 '09 at 14:43
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MenuetOS has always been a "because we can" and "just for fun" project. Don't look for what isn't there. –  Pavel Minaev Aug 20 '09 at 22:13

10 Answers 10

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Interfacing with an OS tends to be easiest in the language it was written in -- C in UNIX and Win32, C++ in BeOS, etc. MenuetOS was designed specifically to make developing assembly applications easy, so the best choice was to write the OS itself in assembly.

For OSes which aren't intended to be general-purpose, such as embedded systems and microcontrollers, the overhead introduced by mechanical translation (ie compilation) of C into assembly can be unacceptable. Compilers aren't as smart as humans, especially when it comes to the sorts of fiddly little optimizations required on embedded platforms, and writing directly in assembly guarantees there won't be a compiler mucking up carefully-designed algorithms.

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"Compilers aren't as smart as humans" that was my guess. –  Lawand Aug 19 '09 at 23:02
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Open the pod bay doors, HAL... –  h4xxr Aug 19 '09 at 23:04
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Compilers are smarter than most programmers. However, a programmer who can write an entire O/S in assembly language, most likely has the advantage. –  Carson Myers Aug 20 '09 at 6:30
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@John - Coming up with an assembly interop standard, forcing API's to conform to that standard, and creating assembly specific samples is a lot less work than writing the entire OS in assembly. –  Michael Aug 20 '09 at 22:58
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I don't think that's because it's harder to interface with the linux OS in assembly. I think it's because it's harder to do anything in assembly. –  Steve Jessop Aug 21 '09 at 9:48

Presumably you can write a compact and fast OS. Though you may not be able to write it quickly, and you lose any hope of trivial portability.

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"can" being the operative word. Its very easy to write slower and larger assembler code than a compiler creates. –  Goz Aug 19 '09 at 21:37
    
@Goz: no arguments from me. I think Tyler McHenry has the most accurate answer. –  dmckee Aug 19 '09 at 21:41
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I should have posted it as an answer and cashed in on the rep points –  Tyler McHenry Aug 19 '09 at 21:51

I'd imagine the advantage was that it gave them a lot of good PR considering the number of places I've seen that story. Reputation gets you the best jobs...

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Main advantage: you don't need a C compiler. Secondary advantage: if you have to make the code size really, really small, then (a) modern compilers are aiming more for fast execution than small code size, and (b) the human penalty for writing assembly code is smaller if the artifact is smaller.

So if you're doing some really tiny OS for some new embedded ISA and it all has to fit in 4K, writing in assembly might be a good choice...

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I suppose that's actually valid, writing a compiler is not a trival undertaking in and of it's self. –  NoMoreZealots Aug 20 '09 at 14:33

There is still an active community of folks who bang out demos in assembly. There are sites where people are even coding demos for 8-bitters like the C64 and Atari XL machines. It's simply thier "weapon of choice." And they enjoy coding in that format. And provides a higher degree of control, but requires a greater understanding of the machine. Their mastery over the machine and ability to do entire executables in less memory than the overhead standard C libs take up give them intense satifaction.

No matter how good your compiler is, it's still follows a mecanical process in generating the code. Assembly pretty much gives you full control, allowing you to do things that aren't easily representable by even a language like C. For example "Atomic operations" are usually wrapped by either a OS call or function call making them substantially less efficient because there is no standard way to represent them in the language it's self. (Sometimes they will be represented by a compiler intrinsic extension to C.)

Also it allows unconventional things to be done, like using the processor stack in ways that you CAN'T in C. (Thus in C you create a "Stack" datastructure using dynamic memory allocation to replicate some thing the processor can natively do.)

Size wize, I've seen a full screen Text mode, text editor that was required less than 512 bytes for the executable image. That was written by a guy I knew from the bulletin boards. (The pre WWW era.) I've seen C startup code that took more memory than that!

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Optimized assembly is the fastest you can get. Even well-optimized C is measurably slower that well-crafted assembly. For a general-purpose operating system, though, the gains are not worth the difficulty. I can't imagine an assembly OS scaling at all in that realm. If I recall, Menuet is meant for very small, simple embedded systems where the increased complexity of assembly code is outweighed by the performance benefits.

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I find that most compilers are a lot smarter humans these days. For inner loops in videogames or something, it could be different. But for mundane stuff you would do with while(), for(), if(), etc..., your compiler will always make better code than you. –  kmm Aug 19 '09 at 21:37
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Did you ever look at the object code a modern c compiler procduces? You can get grey hairs at all the lost cycles and missed optimizations. Seems like an urban myth to me. "Compilers nowadays are much better than assembler". I think I heard it 20 years ago, and it still is far from true. –  hirschhornsalz Aug 19 '09 at 21:54
    
Compilers logically cannot be better than "well-crafted" assembly. Any optimization your compiler can make, you can make, so if your assembly is not as good as your compiler's, that just means you aren't a good enough assembly programmer and you aren't crafting well. Hence, we can speculate that there exist "good enough" human programmers who can beat the C compiler. And quite aside from sophistry, it probably is true, at least for reasonably small amounts of code. –  Steve Jessop Aug 19 '09 at 22:07
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If you improve a compiler's optimizer, you optimize all the code that compiler can compile. If you optimize assembler by hand, you're only optimizing that one routine. The compiler is better. –  Breton Aug 19 '09 at 22:14
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compilers are better than the average programmer. And there are some very good compilers, gcc not being one of them, one size fits all usually means it does not fit anyone in particular. Write in C and hand tune the bottlenecks is the best rule for cost and performance. –  dwelch Aug 20 '09 at 14:00

I guess just performance and size.

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Someone could say - speed and small code (by small code I don't mean source code of course, but compiled one), as for the second one - probably yes, as for speed - I don't know how big the differences are, assuming the fact that you have decent c compiler. But I can give you 1 big disadvantage - you can't port such OS to other architectures, writing OS in assembler binds you to one and chosen processor architecture. I won't even mention time that you have to spend to write such piece of software, compared to C.

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At this point, not much, although it naturally depends on what system and what resources you're writing the OS for. Almost all modern computers come bundled with a C compiler that is basically as close to the machine as you can get, so using Assembly is not going to help. On the other hand, if you're writing code for a robot, Assembly would be very useful.

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The advantages are pretty much none compared to the disadvantages

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