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I have a data file that I need to transform with regular expressions. More specifically, I need to maintain the first 6 columns the same, and from the 7th column on, select only the odd columns, and then put together the fields of each pair of consecutive rows. I know it sounds a bit complicated so I'll clarify this through an example. This is my original data file (it could have any number of columns):

A B C D E F 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18
A B C D E F 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
A B C D E F 31 31 33 34 35 36 37 38
A B C D E F 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48
A B C D E F 51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58
A B C D E F 61 62 63 64 65 66 67 68
A B C D E F 71 72 73 74 75 76 77 78
A B C D E F 81 82 83 84 85 86 87 88

I figured out I can maintain the 6 first columns and then delete the odd ones with

awk '{for (i = 1; i <= NF; i++) if (i < 7 || i % 2 == 1) printf $i OFS}; {print ""}

being this the result:

A B C D E F 11 13 15 17 
A B C D E F 21 23 25 27 
A B C D E F 31 33 35 37 
A B C D E F 41 43 45 47 
A B C D E F 51 53 55 57 
A B C D E F 61 63 65 67 
A B C D E F 71 73 75 77 
A B C D E F 81 83 85 87 

But after that I have to put together the fields of each pair of consecutive rows, like this:

A B C D E F 11 21 13 23 15 25 17 27
A B C D E F 31 41 33 43 35 45 37 47
A B C D E F 51 61 53 63 55 65 57 67
A B C D E F 71 81 73 83 75 85 77 87

I was thinking of using sed or awk to make the whole process, since my data files are huge and I need to transform them efficiently, but I couldn't figure out a way to do the second transformation too. Any help would be highly appreciated.

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6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here's one way using GNU awk. Run like:

awk -f script.awk file.txt

Contents of script.awk:

{
    getline line
    split(line, array)
    k = 6
    n = ((NF - k) % 2 == 0) ? 1 : 0

    for (i=1; i<=k; i++) {
        printf $i OFS
    }

    for (j=7; j<=NF-n; j+=2) {
        x = $j OFS array[j]
        printf (j < NF - n) ? x OFS : x "\n"
    }
}

Results:

A B C D E F 11 21 13 23 15 25 17 27 
A B C D E F 31 41 33 43 35 45 37 47 
A B C D E F 51 61 53 63 55 65 57 67 
A B C D E F 71 81 73 83 75 85 77 87 
share|improve this answer
    
I really appreciate your answer, that's exactly what I was looking for. I'll try both your solution and the one I just came up with, to test which one is faster (though at first glance I guess yours is better). –  Serchu Oct 23 '12 at 11:25
1  
@Serchu: I've finished editing my answer. I've made it a bit more general (and slightly more cryptic too). It'll now handle files that have either an even number of columns or an odd number of columns. You can even set the number of initial columns to keep. HTH. –  Steve Oct 23 '12 at 12:29
    
I understand the temptation to use getline here but it's almost always best to avoid it as it makes simple requirements changes hard to implement (among many other caveats - see awk.info/?tip/getline). What if, for example, you additionally want to keep a count of all lines that contain 45? With a non-getline solution you'd just add "/45/{c++}" to the awk body but with a getline solution you need to do that AND add "if (line~/45/){c++}" after the getline, complicating things and creating duplicate code for just a tiny, conceptually trivial requirements change. –  Ed Morton Oct 23 '12 at 19:11

Try this:

# d.awk
{
    if (NR % 2 == 1) {
        a = $7
        b = $9
        c = $11
        d = $13
    } else {
        print $1, $2, $3, $4, $5, $6, a, $7, b, $9, c, $11, d, $13
    }
}

Result:

% gawk -f d.awk data
A B C D E F 11 21 13 23 15 25 17 27
A B C D E F 31 41 33 43 35 45 37 47
A B C D E F 51 61 53 63 55 65 57 67
A B C D E F 71 81 73 83 75 85 77 87
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Perl solution:

perl -ane '
    BEGIN { $, = " " }
    if ($. % 2) {
        @p = (@F[0..5], @F[grep 1-$_ % 2, 6 .. $#F])
    } else {
        print @p[0..5], (map { $p[$_],  $F[2 * $_ - 6] } 6 .. $#F ), "\n"
    }'
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1  
Ah, Perl. Always a pleasure for the eyes :) –  user647772 Oct 23 '12 at 10:10
2  
@Tichodroma: Unlike your solution, it works for any number of columns as specified in the question. –  choroba Oct 23 '12 at 10:12
    
True, but not required :) –  user647772 Oct 23 '12 at 10:13
    
Yes, it is required indeed. As I said in my question, the data file could have any number of fields (6 + 2*x fields, actually). Anyway thanks a lot both of you, I guess I will try to generalize Tichodroma's solution :). –  Serchu Oct 23 '12 at 10:18
    
+1. Very nice.. –  Guru Oct 23 '12 at 12:34

I come up with this:

{
    if (NR % 2 == 1){
        for(i = 7; i <= NF; i += 2){
            array[i] = $i
        }
    }
    else{
        printf "%s %s %s %s %s %s", $1, $2, $3, $4, $5, $6
        for(i = 7; i <= NF; i += 2){
            printf " %s %s", array[i], $i
        }
        print ""
    }
}

It works for the example of the opening post, with any number of fields. My only concerns about this is that my actual data files contains 2774938 fields, and since I am new to afk, I don't know if this is an efficient way to do it.

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awk '
NR%2 { split($0,a); next }
{
   for(i=7;i<NF;i+=2) {
      $(i+1) = $i
      $i = a[i]
   }
}
1' file

or if you prefer a "cute" solution with some caveats (but which will work with the sample data posted):

awk '
!(NR%2) { printf fmt,$7,$9,$11,$13 }
{ for (i=8;i<=NF;i+=2) $i="%s"; fmt=$0"\n" }
' file
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This might work for you (GNU sed):

sed -r 's/(\s?\S+)\s\S+/\1/4g;h;s/.*//;N;s/(\s?\S+)\s\S+/\1/4g;H;g;s/^(.*)(.*\n)\n\1/\1\n\2/;h;s/[^\n]*\n//;:a;s/([^ \n]*)\n([^ \n]*)/\n\2 \1\n/g;s/\n \n?| \n/\n/g;/\n[^\n ]*$/!ba;y/\n/ /;H;x;s/\n.*\n//' file
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