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I'm sure this has a very simple solution, but I've exhausted my resources. I need to insert a bunch of WideString variables which may contain #0 into a NVARCHAR(1024) column in MSSQL2k8. #0 is treated as the string terminator somewhere in the transition... So, when I store #6'r'#0'abc', only #6'r' is stored. I'm using TADOQuery. What can I do about this?


Here's the code I use:

var
  S: string;
begin
  S := #6'r'#0'abc';
  ADOQuery1.Append;
  ADOQuery1S.Value := S;
  { At this point, S = #6'r'#0'abc' and ADOQuery1S.Value = #6'r';}
  ADOQuery1.Post;
end;
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2  
Delphi itself doesn't care about NULLs in the middle of a string - it has a "known length" of up to 2147483647 characters. However, if using ADO it is probably passing through an C based API that treats it as a terminator. Also if using Xe2, strings are unicode, so there will be two consecutive nulls in the memory block. –  Gerry Coll Oct 23 '12 at 10:44
2  
@TLama - it doesn't care, #0 is just another character. Delphi strings handle nulls without problems, unless they are passed to an API that treats them as terminators. Delphi strings are effectively dynamic arrays of char. Of course most Windows API's do treat them as terminators.\ –  Gerry Coll Oct 23 '12 at 10:47
1  
I don't know enough about the tech to make this an answer, but moving from passing a string to passing a byte array would surely fix the problem. –  AakashM Oct 23 '12 at 10:47
3  
Don't do this. NVARCHAR is not suitable for binary data. if you want to encrypt a password and save a binary result, at least use base64 (or other) to encode it to a string. –  kobik Oct 23 '12 at 10:52
1  
@iman NVARCHAR is ucs-2 (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms186939.aspx). From en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UTF-16: "Both UTF-16 and UCS-2 encode code points in the range U+0000 to U+FFFF as single 16-bit code units that are numerically equal to the corresponding code points. The code points in the BMP are the only code points that can be represented in UCS-2." Strictly speaking not all code points in that range are defined, see e.g. the table defined at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… - there are some gaps. –  Jan Doggen Oct 23 '12 at 12:11
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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you want to store an string encrypted by any means that could have NULLs in it, encode and decode the encrypted data as Base64 using the routines in Soap.EncdDecd.pas (EncdDecd.pas in older versions).

And DO USE proper encryption, either from Microsoft CryptoAPI, or any of the native Delphi implementations such as DCPCrypt.

If you are storing passwords for access to your system, consider hashing (and salting) them instead. Obviously if they are passwords to connect to other systems you can't do that.

var
  B64: string;
begin
  B64 := EncodeString(#6'r'#0'abc');
  ADOQuery1.Append;
  ADOQuery1S.Value := B64;
  ADOQuery1.Post;
end;
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2  
+1 for mentioning hashing –  whosrdaddy Oct 23 '12 at 11:15
    
Unfortunately hash is out of the question, as I need the passwords themselves to pass to some very poor designed software. Now, just one question. Consider I have a string. How can I determine if it is encoded or not using the EncdDecd functions? –  iMan Biglari Oct 23 '12 at 11:20
3  
@iManBiglari, if a string is Base64 encoded or not you can only guess. –  TLama Oct 23 '12 at 11:25
1  
Never mind... Figured an easy way to put a * at the beginning of the encoded strings and remove it before decoding –  iMan Biglari Oct 23 '12 at 11:25
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If you can change the schema, use VARBINARY or IMAGE instead. These field types are designed to hold binary data.

create table MY_DATA ( FLD_1 varbinary(2048), FLD_2 image )
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