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For simplicity sake lets assume I have the following two classes:

public class ComplexClass
{
    public List<SubClass> SubClasses { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

public class SubClass
{
    public string Name { get; set; }
}

I have a List<ComplexClass> and I need to build a query based on some parameters.

It's an easy task if all I need to do is use the Name property of ComplexClass. Here's an example:

    static IQueryable<ComplexClass> GetQuery(string someParameter, string someOtherParameter)
    {
        var query = list.AsQueryable();
        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(someParameter))
            query = query.Where(c => c.Name.StartsWith(someParameter));
        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(someOtherParameter))
            query = query.Where(c => c.Name.EndsWith(someOtherParameter));
        return query;
    }

Based on the parameters I have I can add more query elements. Of course the above example is simple, but the actual problem contains more parameters, and that number can grow.

Things aren't as simple if I want to find those ComplexClass instances which have SubClass instances which meet criteria based on parameters:

    static IQueryable<ComplexClass> GetSubQuery(string someParameter, string someOtherParameter)
    {
        var query = list.AsQueryable();
        if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(someParameter))
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(someOtherParameter))
                return query.Where(c => c.SubClasses.Where(sc => sc.Name.StartsWith(someParameter) && sc.Name.EndsWith(someOtherParameter)).Any());
            else
                return query.Where(c => c.SubClasses.Where(sc => sc.Name.StartsWith(someParameter)).Any());
        else
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(someOtherParameter))
                return query.Where(c => c.SubClasses.Where(sc => sc.Name.EndsWith(someOtherParameter)).Any());
            else
                return null;
    }

I can no longer just add bits of the query based on each parameter, I now need to write the whole query in one go, and this means I need to check every combination of parameters, which is hardly ideal.

I suspect the key is to build an Expression class and create a lambda expression from that, but I'm not sure how to tackle the problem.

Any suggestions? :)

EDIT:

My initial idea was this:

    static IQueryable<ComplexClass> GetSubQuery(string someParameter, string someOtherParameter)
    {
        var query = list.AsQueryable();
        query = query.Where(c =>
        {
            var subQuery = c.SubClasses.AsQueryable();
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(someParameter))
                subQuery = subQuery.Where(sc => sc.Name.StartsWith(someParameter));
            if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(someOtherParameter))
                subQuery = subQuery.Where(sc => sc.Name.EndsWith(someOtherParameter));
            return subQuery.Any();
        });
        return query;
    }

This works in my small console test application as it's using LINQ to Objects. Unfortunately, I need to use Entity Framework and LINQ to Entities, which causes an implementation similar to the one above to throw a A lambda expression with a statement body cannot be converted to an expression tree error message.

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you are using "someParameter" and "someOtherParameter" just for checking if they are null or not,not actually using in where condition,then whats the perpose of them?it seems like they are case related...explain more... –  Amol Kolekar Oct 23 '12 at 10:18
    
You can replace .Where(predicate).Any() with .Any(predicate). –  Daniel Hilgarth Oct 23 '12 at 10:26
    
Amol: The parameters are nullable, yes, but in the actual final code are used in the queries. Indeed, the examples may seem a bit silly. I'll edit the examples. Daniel: I know, but that doesn't simply the problem. –  Shaamaan Oct 23 '12 at 10:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm assuming that in you real-life code the SubClasses property is IQueryable<SubClass> rather than List<SubClass>?

If so, then your query building becomes easy:

static IQueryable<ComplexClass> GetSubQuery(
    string someParameter, string someOtherParameter)
{
    var query = list.AsQueryable();
    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(someParameter))
        query = query.Where(c => c.SubClasses
            .Where(sc => sc.Name.StartsWith(someParameter)).Any());
    if (!String.IsNullOrEmpty(someOtherParameter))
        query = query.Where(c => c.SubClasses
            .Where(sc => sc.Name.StartsWith(someOtherParameter)).Any());
    return query;
}

Mixing IEnumerable<T> and IQueryable<T> using AsQueryable() is never a good idea.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh dear... it was so simple all along... >_< Thanks a bunch! –  Shaamaan Oct 23 '12 at 11:16
    
Wait... wouldn't such an approach (assuming all parameters are not null) cause the query to take a long(er) time to execute? I just had an idea to use SelectMany to create a sub-query, build it like I would the query in the first example, then do query.Where(cc=>cc.SubClasses.Where(sc=>subQuery.Contains(sc)).Any())... this would work, but I'm not sure which one is faster (if at all there is a difference). –  Shaamaan Oct 23 '12 at 11:43
    
@Shaamaan - I'm not sure I'd worry about speed if I were you until you are sure that you have a performance issue. The chances are good that even if it repeats the sub-query that caching will speed the second sub-query up enormously. –  Enigmativity Oct 23 '12 at 23:19
    
Good point. :) I guess this is a perfect example of KISS. >_< –  Shaamaan Oct 24 '12 at 7:26

I implemented my solution in a simple Console Project:

internal class Program
{
    #region Constants and Fields

    private static readonly List<ComplexClass> list = new List<ComplexClass>
                                                          {
                                                              new ComplexClass
                                                                  {
                                                                      Name = "complex", 
                                                                      SubClasses = new List<SubClass>
                                                                                       {
                                                                                           new SubClass
                                                                                               {
                                                                                                   SubName = "foobar"
                                                                                               }
                                                                                       }
                                                                  }, 
                                                              new ComplexClass
                                                                  {
                                                                      Name = "complex", 
                                                                      SubClasses = new List<SubClass>
                                                                                       {
                                                                                           new SubClass
                                                                                               {
                                                                                                   SubName = "notfoobar"
                                                                                               }
                                                                                       }
                                                                  }
                                                          };

    #endregion

    #region Public Methods

    public static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("foo / bar :");
        GetSubQuery("foo", "bar");
        Console.WriteLine();

        Console.WriteLine("foo / null :");
        GetSubQuery("foo", null);
        Console.WriteLine();

        Console.WriteLine("string.Empty / bar :");
        GetSubQuery(string.Empty, "bar");
        Console.WriteLine();

        Console.WriteLine("maeh / bar :");
        GetSubQuery("maeh", "bar");

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    #endregion

    #region Methods

    private static void GetSubQuery(string startsWith, 
        string endsWith)
    {
        var query = from item in list
                    let StartIsNull = string.IsNullOrEmpty(startsWith)
                    let EndIsNull = string.IsNullOrEmpty(endsWith)
                    where
                        (StartIsNull || item.SubClasses.Any(sc => sc.SubName.StartsWith(startsWith)))
                        && (EndIsNull || item.SubClasses.Any(sc => sc.SubName.EndsWith(endsWith)))
                    select item;

        foreach (var complexClass in query)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(complexClass.SubClasses.First().SubName);
        }
    }

    #endregion

    public class ComplexClass
    {
        #region Public Properties

        public string Name { get; set; }
        public List<SubClass> SubClasses { get; set; }

        #endregion
    }

    public class SubClass
    {
        #region Public Properties

        public string SubName { get; set; }

        #endregion
    }
}

The Console Output is:

foo / bar :
foobar

foo / null :
foobar

string.Empty / bar :
foobar
notfoobar

maeh / bar :
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