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I have a form with a hidden field:

<input type="hidden" name="newdesc[]" id="newdesc" />

I have an autolookup and a plus button so the plus button adds the field value of the autolookup to an array:

newdesc_a.push(document.getElementById('autocomplete1').value);
var x=document.getElementById("businesslist");
x.innerHTML=newdesc_a;
document.getElementById('newdesc').value = newdesc_a;

(newdesc_a is previously declared as an array)

It updates the div OK (businesslist) but does not assign the value to the newdesc.

I am sure it is simple but it is driving me mad!

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2 Answers 2

Given the name="newdesc[]" attribute, I assume PHP on the server side. When you submit a key two or more times, only the last value is available in the script via $_REQUEST. In the case of a key ending with [] , instead, PHP builds an array and make it available to your script via $_REQUEST['key']. Note that this behavior is application-specific, there's nothing like an array at the HTTP level.

Now, you want to pass an array from the client side (Javascript) to the backend (PHP). You have two options:

  1. Use a proprietary format, eg separate values by commas or colons, and split the string on the server side (or you can use an existing format like JSON, XML, ...)

  2. Take advantage of the PHP syntax for passing arrays

It seems you want to adopt the 2nd way, so you will want to submit a form like the following

<input name="email[]" value="joel@example.com" />
<input name="email[]" value="mark@people.com" />
<input name="email[]" value="bill@hello.com" />

PHP will be able to access a plain array in $_REQUEST if you build your form like this. Now, you have the problem of building the form programmatically on demand. This is the best I can think of (jQuery):

var email = $("#autocomplete").value;

// if you really need to keep emails in an array, just
// emails.push(email);

$('<input type="hidden">').attr({
    name: 'email[]',
    value: email
}).appendTo('#myForm');
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Thanks. I have no problem usually in passing an array as a POST but it is simply a case of getting the javascript to assign it to the value of the form field. –  Jim Elliott Oct 23 '12 at 11:25
    
No, you don't undestand the principle. If you want a prebuilt array in PHP, you want to adopt my solution. If you want to assign an array to an input field, well you have to manually serialize it (array -> string) on the client side (joining strings by commas, or JSON for example) and deserialize (string -> array) on the server. See this fiddle to get a taste. Note that on the server side you won't have an array: you'll have a string, which you will manually convert back to a PHP array –  Raffaele Oct 23 '12 at 11:35

You want to assign a particular value of array to that element?

You can use like this.

document.getElementById('newdesc').value = newdesc_a.index;

where 'index' is the index of array. replace it.

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if it's an array, it should read newdesc_a[index], not .index, to avoid syntaxError –  Elias Van Ootegem Oct 23 '12 at 10:53
    
newsdesc_a now contains the full array so my idea is to completely replace the vale of newdesc –  Jim Elliott Oct 23 '12 at 10:55
    
You can do it like one of the 2 below options. 1. JSON.stringify(array) and assign string value. 2. Append each value using for loop –  Kiran Ambati Oct 23 '12 at 10:57
    
I tried adding this: –  Jim Elliott Oct 23 '12 at 11:02
    
var y = JSON.stringify(newsdesc_a); document.getElementById('newdesc').value = y; –  Jim Elliott Oct 23 '12 at 11:03

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