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I want all the Classes,Tags and Ids within css.css overwritten over bootstrap.min.css without repeating the Classes,tags and Ids of bootstrap.min.css.

<link href="css/bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet">
<link href="css/css.css" rel="stylesheet">
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closed as not constructive by GolezTrol, flem, freefaller, BNL, Joel Mueller Oct 23 '12 at 22:12

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
What do you mean? css.css will overrule bootstrap.min.css, but only for those rules that are defined in css.css. –  GolezTrol Oct 23 '12 at 11:31
    
Answering this is can be lengthy, as this is a vague subject. There is a whole chapter about this on the w3 website. CSS Cascade –  Dan Oct 23 '12 at 11:36
    
@GolezTrol exactly. without using!important or repeating everything. –  alnassre Oct 23 '12 at 12:25
    
@alnassre Did you mean to open up this can of worms or were you just looking for a simple answer? –  Rob Forrest Oct 23 '12 at 12:59

8 Answers 8

When you include a stylesheet, it overwrites all declarations of the before included stylesheets. If you change your includes to:

<link href="css/css.css" rel="stylesheet">
<link href="css/bootstrap.min.css" rel="stylesheet">

Bootstrap is later included and will overwrite propertys from css.css.

Hope that helps.

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This isn't enough. If you have div .some-class{} in the less important css file, you cannot overwrite it with .some-class{} but it MIGHT be overwritten with p .some-class{} depending on the HTML structure. It is far more complicated then just having the order of the CSS files. Especially since the OP says without repeating the Classes,tags and Ids, it isn't quite clear what he wants, but I think it means he doesn't want to use the same rules. –  Dan Oct 23 '12 at 11:43
    
Yes. But with the code he provided this is the only solution I can directly offer. –  TobSpr Oct 23 '12 at 11:44
    
@TobiasSpringer that's totally the opposite. the css.css is in there right order, what @Dan said is my exactly needed. –  alnassre Oct 23 '12 at 12:31

Simple, include the more important CSS file last.

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2  
This isn't enough. If you have div .some-class{} in the less important css file, you cannot overwrite it with .some-class{} but it MIGHT be overwritten with p .some-class{} depending on the HTML structure. It is far more complicated then just having the order of the CSS files. Especially since the OP says without repeating the Classes,tags and Ids, it isn't quite clear what he wants, but I think it means he doesn't want to use the same rules. –  Dan Oct 23 '12 at 11:42
1  
@Dan, this question is simple enough to warrant a simple answer. You are, of course, correct in what you say, but the title of the question relates purely to making one file more important than another. –  Rob Forrest Oct 23 '12 at 12:23
    
@Dan, although I'm on your side on this, I'd rather close-vote the question that to give an answer that eventually doesn't answer the underlying question and therefor won't add much value. –  GolezTrol Oct 23 '12 at 12:32

if you cant alter the files, and the order of the call of the css file is not working, you can always use !important, but that is gonna comsume a lot of time becuz you need to add it on every line of css.

ex: display: inline !important;

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I can only give you an example.

Lets say Bootstrap.css has the following .rules #world {border:0px;} [specificity 110]

and css.css has the following div #world{border:20px;} [specificity 101]

In this case, bootstrap.css will always override css.css. So, I advise you to add a container to all of your content - give this container a id..lets say "god" and then add the prefix .god to all of your styles in css - but again, this is not as simple, and depends a lot on how you get your calculations right.

#god div #world{border:20px;}

This is a length topic as someone else pointed out - so you'll have to basically know what all bootstrap is doing to your page and what is css.css doing.

You can always look up this wonderful article which never gets old http://coding.smashingmagazine.com/2007/07/27/css-specificity-things-you-should-know/

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Adding to this: css-tricks.com/specifics-on-css-specificity –  Rockbot Oct 23 '12 at 12:07

There is no such magic. CSS has its own principles, such as the cascade, and you cannot switch them off.

You can place the reference to css.css after the reference to bootstrap.min.css, but this is just one factor in the process of resolving how CSS rules will be applied. Adding !important, which is generally a symptom of wrong design, is just yet another factor: an !important rule in an earlier file may override your !important rule, if its selector has higher specificity.

To override CSS rules, you need to analyze the rule you wish to override and set up a rule that “wins”, by the cascade principles.

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umm, It look like that no magic solution yet. –  alnassre Oct 23 '12 at 12:31
    
@alnassre Like I said, you won't be able to find a good answer about this, almost all the answers here are correct but all of them are lacking. I strongly recommend for you to read this w3.org/TR/CSS21/cascade.html try it out, and then after having an idea on how it works, you will be able to ask more specific answers about the subject. –  Dan Oct 23 '12 at 15:16
    
The "higher specificity" was the right tip. I have div.x and on some divs additionally to x a selected. That didn't work until i switched in the CSS from div.selected to div.x.selected. Now, selected has higher priority. –  koppor Feb 24 at 13:39

Refer it last item in a list which will always override previous style sheets

Below will force your page to fit 980px since it overrides the previous stylesheet property

Example

Style1.css

 #main{ width:1000px;}

Style2.css

 #main{ width:980px;} 
      or  
 #main{ width:980px !important;} /* if needed only */

HTML

<link href="style1.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />
<link href="style2.css" rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" />

<div id="main"></div>
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If you are working with bootstrap, this article might be useful:

http://stackoverflow.com/a/12819825/1064416

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I think you could do one thing is that include only css.css and @import "css/bootstrap.min.css" within css.css so your code will be like this

Within html

<link href="css/css.css" rel="stylesheet">

and Within css.css

@import "css/bootstrap.min.css"

.bootstrap_class{//your style..}
.hero-unit{background: red;}

Using this trick you can override bootstrap styling without any Showing results for headache this

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