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I was asked this question in an interview, and I couldn't answer it well.

More specifically, the class to which the assignment operator belongs looks like this:

class A {
private:
    B* pb;
    C* pc;
    ....
public:
    ....
}

How to implement an atomic (thread-safe) and exception-safe, deep copy assignment operator for this class?

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5  
a thread-safe assignment operator? those interviewers are really pushing it –  stijn Oct 23 '12 at 12:22
2  
How to implement an everything-safe-anything? Certainly not by using plain C pointers and messing around with copies of the objects they point to... we have RAII and smart pointers for safety, don't we? –  leftaroundabout Oct 23 '12 at 12:26
8  
A deep copy doesn't make sense here, since no raw pointers should own anything and should only observe. ;) –  Xeo Oct 23 '12 at 12:36
2  
@Xeo As lovely as it would be if actual industrial codebases regularly made proper use of RAII, the truth of the matter is there is plenty of existing code out there that uses raw pointers as owning pointers. Trying to improve such codebases towards better practices costs a lot of time, can cause unexpected bugs, and can be a losing battle politically. So whether you think it 'makes sense' or not, a C++ maintainer can benefit from knowing how to work in these less-than-ideal situations. –  WeirdlyCheezy Oct 25 '12 at 19:11
4  
@WeirdlyCheezy But doesn't working in these less-than-ideal situations amount to one of: #1 making it even worse; #2 making it closer to ideal? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Oct 27 '12 at 12:40

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted
+50

There are two separate concerns (thread-safety and exception-safety) and it seems best to address them separately. To allow constructors taking another object as argument to acquire a lock while initializing the members, it is necessary to factor the data members into a separate class anyway: This way a lock can be acquired while the subobject is initialized and the class maintaining the actual data can ignore any concurrency issues. Thus, the class will be split into two parts: class A to deal with concurrency issues and class A_unlocked to maintain the data. Since the member functions of A_unlocked don't have any concurrency protection, they shouldn't be directly exposed in the interface and, thus, A_unlocked is made a private member of A.

Creating an exception-safe assignment operator is straight forward, leveraging the copy constructor. The argument is copied and the members are swapped:

A_unlocked& A_unlocked::operator= (A_unlocked const& other) {
    A_unlocked(other).swap(*this);
    return *this;
}

Of course, this means that a suitable copy constructor and a swap() member are implemented. Dealing with the allocation of multiple resources, e.g., multiple objects allocated on the heap, is easiest done by having a suitable resource handler for each of the objects. Without the use of resource handlers it becomes quickly very messy to correctly clean up all resources in case an exception is thrown. For the purpose of maintaining heap allocated memory std::unique_ptr<T> (or std::auto_ptr<T> if you can't use C++ 2011) is a suitable choice. The code below just copies the pointed to objects although there isn't much point in allocating the objects on the heap rather than making them members. In a real example the objects would probably implement a clone() method or some other mechanism to create an object of the correct type:

class A_unlocked {
private:
    std::unique_ptr<B> pb;
    std::unique_ptr<C> pc;
    // ...
public:
    A_unlocked(/*...*/);
    A_unlocked(A_unlocked const& other);
    A_unlocked& operator= (A_unlocked const& other);
    void swap(A_unlocked& other);
    // ...
};

A_unlocked::A_unlocked(A_unlocked const& other)
    : pb(new B(*other.pb))
    , pc(new C(*other.pc))
{
}
void A_unlocked::swap(A_unlocked& other) {
    using std::swap;
    swap(this->pb, other.pb);
    swap(this->pc, other.pc);
}

For the thread-safety bit it is necessary to know that no other thread is messing with the copied object. The way to do this is using a mutex. That is, class A looks something like this:

class A {
private:
    mutable std::mutex d_mutex;
    A_unlocked         d_data;
public:
    A(/*...*/);
    A(A const& other);
    A& operator= (A const& other);
    // ...
};

Note, that all members of A will need to do some concurrency protection if the objects of type A are meant to be used without external locking. Since the mutex used to guard against concurrent access isn't really part of the object's state but needs to be changed even when reading the object's state, it is made mutable. With this in place, creating a copy constructor is straight forward:

A::A(A const& other)
    : d_data((std::unique_lock<std::mutex>(other.d_mutex), other.d_data)) {
}

This locks the argument's mutex and delegates to the member's copy constructor. The lock is automatically released at the end of the expression, independent of whether the copy was successful or threw an exception. The object being constructed doesn't need any locking because there is no way that another thread knows about this object, yet.

The core logic of the assignment operator also just delegates to the base, using its assignment operator. The tricky bit is that there are two mutexes which need to be locked: the one for the object being assigned to and the one for the argument. Since another thread could assign the two objects in just the opposite way, there is a potential for dead-lock. Conveniently, the standard C++ library provides the std::lock() algorithm which acquires locks in an appropriate way that avoids dead-locks. One way to use this algorithm is to pass in unlocked std::unique_lock<std::mutex> objects, one for each mutex needed to be acquired:

A& A::operator= (A const& other) {
    if (this != &other) {
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> guard_this(this->d_mutex, std::defer_lock);
        std::unique_lock<std::mutex> guard_other(other.d_mutex, std::defer_lock);
        std::lock(guard_this, guard_other);

        *this->d_data = other.d_data;
    }
    return *this;
}

If at any point during the assignment an exception is thrown, the lock guards will release the mutexes and the resource handlers will release any newly allocated resource. Thus, the above approach implements the strong exception guarantee. Interestingly, the copy assignment needs to do a self-assignment check to prevent locking the same mutex twice. Normally, I maintain that a necessary self-assignment check is an indication that the assignment operator isn't exception safe but I think the code above is exception safe.

This is a major rewrite of the answer. Earlier versions of this answer were either prone to a lost update or to a dead-lock. Thanks to Yakk for pointing out the problems. Although the result of addressing the issues involves more code, I think each individual part of the code is actually simpler and can be investigated for correctness.

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wouldn't this lead to not beeing threadsafe anymore (Thread A copies, thread b modifies)? Shouldn't it try to lock both and make a special case if source and destination is the same and accquire just one lock then? Besides how is selfAssignments making sense, is there an example? –  ted Oct 23 '12 at 14:08
2  
Copying the right hand side is atomic because it is locked while the copy is done. Assigning to the left hand side is legal until the lock is taken which is conceptually equivalent to taking it before copying except for the case of self-assignment. There is a potential when self-assigning that the copy is taken and a different thread canges the object before the copy is put into place. This is an interesting place where a check for self-assignment may be reasonable. Self-assugnment shouldn't really happen but if it hapoens it shouldn't cause programs to fail. –  Dietmar Kühl Oct 23 '12 at 16:23
1  
The surprise you can run into with the above technique is Thread1 doing Y=X, Thread2 doing (Lock X and Y) then X.B = nullptr, Y.B = nullptr, then unlock. After both threads finish, you can have Y.B != nullptr. In essence, this isn't an atomic read-write assignment, but merely an atomic read followed by an atomic write. –  Yakk Oct 26 '12 at 23:06
2  
This post contains a potential deadlock now, instead of a race condition, right here: std::unique_lock<std::mutex> kerberos(this->d_mutex); A tmp(other); // needs to lock other's mutex We lock this, then while holding this lock we lock other. So if thread 1 does X=Y and thread 2 does Y=X, the two threads could deadlock. Locking multiple mutexes should not be done casually. –  Yakk Oct 27 '12 at 20:39
1  
@jogojapan: The use of d_data twice was a typo (fixed). The copy constructor of A_unlock takes just an A_unlock. However, the call uses the comma operator to first lock the mutex using the temporary std::unique_lock<std::mutex>(this->d_mutex) and then produces the argument to the copy constructor. This is why there is an extra pair of parenthesis. –  Dietmar Kühl Oct 28 '12 at 2:10

First, you must understand that no operation is thread safe, but rather all operations on a given resource can be mutually thread safe. So we must discuss the behavior of non-assignment operator code.

The simplest solution would be to make the data immutable, write an Aref class that uses the pImpl class to store an immutable reference counted A, and have mutating methods on Aref cause a new A to be created. You can achieve granularity by having immutable reference counted components of A (like B and C) follow a similar pattern. Basically, Aref becomes a COW (copy on write) pImpl wrapper for an A (you can include optimizations to handle single-reference cases to do away with the redundant copy).

A second route would be to create a monolithic lock (mutex or reader-writer) on A and all of its data. In that case, you either need mutex ordering on the locks for instances of A (or a similar technique) to create a race-free operator=, or accept the possibly surprising race condition possibility and do the copy-swap idiom Dietmar mentioned. (Copy-move is also acceptable) (Explicit race condition in the lock-copyconstruct, lock-swap assignment operator=: Thread1 does X=Y. Thread 2 does Y.flag = true, X.flag = true. State afterwards: X.flag is false. Even if Thread2 locks both X and Y over the entire assignment, this can happen. This would surprise many programmers.)

In the first case, non-assignment code has to obey the copy-on-write semantics. In the second case, non-assignment code has to obey the monolithic lock.

As for exception safety, if you presume your copy constructor is exception safe, as is your lock code, the lock-copy-lock-swap one (the second) is exception safe. For the first one, so long as your reference counting, lock clone and data modification code is exception safe you are good: the operator= code is pretty brain dead in either case. (Make sure your locks are RAII, store all allocated memory in a std RAII pointer holder (with the ability to release if you end up handing it off), etc.)

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Exception-safe? Operations on primitives don't throw so we can get that for free.

Atomic? The simplest would be an atomic swap for 2xsizeof(void*)- I believe that most platforms do offer this. If they don't, you'd have to resort to either using a lock, or there are lockless algorithms which can work.

Edit: Deep copy, huh? You'd have to copy A and B into new temporary smart pointers, then atomically swap them.

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Would you mind to add several lines of codes? –  Dante is not a Geek Oct 24 '12 at 11:42
4  
No. Why would I do that? –  Puppy Oct 27 '12 at 12:54

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