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class Person {
  public String firstname;
  public String lastname;
}

Person p1 = new Person("Jim","Green");
Person p2 = new Person("Tony","White");

ArrayList<Person> people = new ArrayList<Person>();

people.add(p1);
people.add(p2);

System.out.println(people.toString());

I have to override class Person's ToString method so that p1.toString() yields Green, Jim. As a result, the output of the code above will be [Green, Jim,White, Tony] which is not desirable. It would be easier for text processing programs if the output is, for example [Green, Jim&White, Tony]. The default delimiter needs to be replaced by other symbols such as &. What is the simplest way to achieve that if there is any?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why do you need to do this with the toString method?

I would suggest that you pass your list to a customized formatter class of your own making. However, if you insist, I think that one alternative is that you extend ArrayList and override the toString method only.

One choice could be to let the Person class itself deal with the complexity of formatting the collection of items of its own type:

public class Person {
    private String firstName;
    private String lastName;

    public Person(String firstName, String lastName) {
        this.firstName = firstName;
        this.lastName = lastName;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return this.lastName + ", " + this.firstName;
    }

    public static String toString(Collection<Person> persons) {
        Iterator<Person> it = persons.iterator();
        if (!it.hasNext())
            return "[]";

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        sb.append('[');
        for (;;) {
            Person e = it.next();
            sb.append(e);
            if (!it.hasNext())
                return sb.append(']').toString();
            sb.append('&').append(' ');
        }
    }
}

Then you could simply do something like:

Person p1 = new Person("Obi-wan", "Kenobi");
Person p2 = new Person("Luke", "Skywalker");
List<Person> jedis = new ArrayList<>();
jedis.add(p1);
jedis.add(p2);
System.out.println(Person.toString(jedis));

Output is: [Kenobi, Obi-wan& Skywalker, Luke]

But this is just an idea. I am pretty sure there are many other ways to do it.

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Big No for overridding. Customized formatter is good option. –  Ravi K Oct 23 '12 at 13:15

why not return [firstname,lastname] from your Person class?

so if you will have a list, you will get [[Jim,Green],[Tony,White]], and in this case you can easy and clearly see what you have?

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I think you just asked a similar question few hours ago. But here's a little difference though. For this case, you just need to return the concatenation of your fields from your toString() method.

And why not just use a different delimiter between names rather than in ArrayList. That would be much easier task: -

@Override
public String toString() {
    return this.lastname+ ":" + this.firstname;
}

This gives you: -

[Green:Jim, White:Tony]

And the above representation looks much cleaner, and clearly separates your names with ,, as it should be in case of any List. Elements should always be separated with , else it may create confusion later on. For E.G: -

[Green, Jim&White, Tony]

The above list seems to me a 3 elements list, with values : - Green, Jim&White, and Tony.

P.S.: -

You should never use public modifier for your fields. Your fields should always be private, unless you really need to be used outside your class directly. Rather provide public accessor methods to access them. I would suggest even to use getters and setters to access the fields in the same class also.

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you can override the Person class's toString() and use a different delimiter to output "Green Jim" as output

class Person {
    public String firstname;
    public String lastname;

    @Override
    public String toString() { 
        return lastname + " " + firstname;
    }
}

the output would change to

[Green Jim,White Tony]
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As others have said, a custom formatter is the best option. Another option is to implement your own custom ArrayList that overrides the default toString(). So once you have your Person.toString() working correctly, you can make an ArrayList Class that looks like:

import java.util.ArrayList;

public class CustomArrayList<T> extends ArrayList<T> {

    private static final long serialVersionUID = 1L;

    @Override
    public String toString() {

        int size = size();

        StringBuilder output = new StringBuilder();

        String delimiter = "&";

        for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) {

            output.append( get( i ) );
            if ( i < size - 1 ) {

                output.append( delimiter );
            }
        }

        return output.toString();
    }
}
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