Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've currently switched my focus from R to Python. I work with data.table in R a lot, and I find it sometimes quite difficult to find an equivalent for some functions in Python.

I have a pandas data frame that looks like this:

df = pd.DataFrame({'A':['abc','def', 'def', 'abc', 'def', 'def','abc'],'B':[13123,45,1231,463,142131,4839, 4341]})

     A       B  
0  abc   13123    
1  def      45  
2  def    1231  
3  abc     463  
4  def  142131  
5  def    4839
6  abc    4341

I need to create a column that increments from 1 based on A and B, so that it indicates the increasing order of B. So I first create the sorted data frame, and the column I'm interested in creating is C as below:

    A       B   C
1  abc     463  1
6  abc    4341  2
0  abc   13123  3
3  def      45  1
2  def    1231  2
5  def    4839  3
4  def  142131  4

In R, using the library(data.table), this can be easily done in one line and creates a column within the original data table:

df[, C := 1:.N, by=A]

I've looked around and I think I might be able to make use of something like this:

df.groupby('A').size()
or
df['B'].argsort()

but not sure how to proceed from here, and how to join the new column back to the original data frame. It would be very helpful if anyone could give me any pointer.

Many thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
That appears to be incorrect data.table syntax. Do you mean df[,C:=1:.N,by=A]? And why setkey first, you can just leave it to an ad hoc by. –  Matt Dowle Oct 23 '12 at 13:51
    
Yes, sorry, I've corrected the typo in R code. Thanks for pointing it out. Anyway, I'm more interested in finding a way to do this in Python. –  S.zhen Oct 23 '12 at 14:03
    
That's still wrong. That'll copy the whole of df which is one of the (somewhat poor) features of R's data.frame that data.table improves. You can't have used data.table very much, to have missed this. –  Matt Dowle Oct 23 '12 at 14:08
3  
Because := by group is a main feature of data.table. You've posted to a python and pandas tag, so as the author of data.table I don't like to see data.table used badly in front of a wide audience. –  Matt Dowle Oct 23 '12 at 14:30
1  
Okay, sure. I got your point. I've modified the R code above. –  S.zhen Oct 23 '12 at 14:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
In [61]: df
Out[61]:
     A       B
1  abc     463
6  abc    4341
0  abc   13123
3  def      45
2  def    1231
5  def    4839
4  def  142131

In [62]: df['C'] =  df.groupby('A')['A'].transform(lambda x: pd.Series(range(1, len(x)+1), index=x.index))

In [63]: df
Out[63]:
     A       B  C
1  abc     463  1
6  abc    4341  2
0  abc   13123  3
3  def      45  1
2  def    1231  2
5  def    4839  3
4  def  142131  4
share|improve this answer
    
That works (except that the sorted data frame is actually different). Thanks a lot! –  S.zhen Oct 23 '12 at 14:31
    
Started from frame sorted on A only, i edited this order is now the same as in example. –  Wouter Overmeire Oct 23 '12 at 14:47
    
Hi Wouter, thanks for your thorough answer. As a follow-up question, how can I create a column ['D'] which enumerates from the minimum value of B, so that it looks like: [463, 464, 465, 45, 46, 47, 48] in this case? (Sorry for not knowing how to format it correctly in comment!) –  S.zhen Oct 24 '12 at 15:41
    
Actually, I think I've figured it out: df['D'] = df.groupby('A')['B'].transform(lambda x: pd.Series(range(min(x), min(x)+len(x)), index=x.index)) works well! (I've also figured out how to format in comment too) –  S.zhen Oct 24 '12 at 16:06

And for comparison, the correct data.table syntax is :

df[, C := 1:.N, by=A]

This adds a new column C by reference to df. The := operator is part of the data.table package for R. It allows you to add and remove columns and assign to subsets of data.table, by group, by reference with no copy at all.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a quick name for the dual of this operation? Say, if I want to unwrap a repeating increasing sequence, instead of repeating each time a column changes value. (If it's not a quick answer, please let me know and I'll make it a question. Thanks.) –  Trevor Alexander May 7 at 3:00

Index magic seems to be another way:

df['C']=df.sort(['A','B'],inplace=True).groupby('A').reset_index().index.labels[1]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.