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I came across this question in a quiz,

public class MoneyCalc {

   public void method(Object o) {
      System.out.println("Object Verion");
   }

   public void method(String s) {
      System.out.println("String Version");
   }

   public static void main(String args[]) {
      MoneyCalc question = new MoneyCalc();
      question.method(null);
   }
}

The output of this program is "String Version". But I was not able to understand why passing a null to an overloaded method chose the string version. Is null a String variable pointing to nothing ?

However when the code is changed to,

public class MoneyCalc {

   public void method(StringBuffer sb) {
      System.out.println("StringBuffer Verion");
   }

   public void method(String s) {
      System.out.println("String Version");
   }

   public static void main(String args[]) {
      MoneyCalc question = new MoneyCalc();
      question.method(null);
   }
}

it gives a compile error saying "The method method(StringBuffer) is ambiguous for the type MoneyCalc"

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You can assign a string to a null value so it is valid and the order for java and most programming languages is fit to the closest type and then to object. –  JonH Oct 23 '12 at 14:44
    
5  
Apparently this was closed as duplicate by people who only read the title. The actual question here is about why a specific overload was chosen, not "what is null". –  interjay Oct 24 '12 at 10:06

5 Answers 5

up vote 78 down vote accepted

Is null a String variable pointing to nothing ?

A null reference can be converted to an expression of any class type. So in the case of String, this is fine:

String x = null;

The String overload here is chosen because the Java compiler picks the most specific overload, as per section 15.12.2.5 of the JLS. In particular:

The informal intuition is that one method is more specific than another if any invocation handled by the first method could be passed on to the other one without a compile-time type error.

In your second case, both methods are still applicable, but neither String nor StringBuffer is more specific than the other, therefore neither method is more specific than the other, hence the compiler error.

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3  
And how is the String overload more specific than the Object overload? –  user1610015 Oct 23 '12 at 14:48
7  
Because an Object can take any type and wrap it in an Object, whereas a String can only take a String. In this case, String is more specific of a type compared to the Object type. –  JonH Oct 23 '12 at 14:48
8  
@zakSyed If you were asked what is more specialized "String" or "Object", what would you say? Evidently "String", right? If you were asked: what is more specialized "String" or "StringBuffer"? There is no answer, they are both orthogonal specializations, how can you choose between them? Then you must be explicit regarding which one you want (i.e. by casting your null reference question.method((String)null)) –  Edwin Dalorzo Oct 23 '12 at 15:01
1  
@JonSkeet: That makes sense. So basically it looks for a method according to the most specific rule and if it not able to decide which is more specific then it would throw a compile-time error. –  zakSyed Oct 23 '12 at 15:03
3  
@JonH "null" is reference type, if one of the methods receives a primitive type as parameter (i.e. int) it will not even be considered by the compiler when choosing the right method to invoke for a reference of type null. It is confusing if by "Int" you meant java.lang.Integer or if you meant the primitive type int. –  Edwin Dalorzo Oct 23 '12 at 15:12

Additionally, the JLS 3.10.7 also declares that "null" is a literal value of the "null type". Therefore there exists a type called "null".

Later, the JLS 4.1 states that there exists a null type of which is impossible to declare variables, but you can use it through the null literal only. Later it says:

The null reference can always undergo a widening reference conversion to any reference type.

Why the compiler chooses to widen it to String might well be explained in Jon's answer.

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I'm quite sure that type is Void. –  xavierm02 Oct 23 '12 at 15:56
1  
@xavierm02 There is no mention of that in the Java Language Specification. Can you cite your reference so that we all can verify your claim? –  Edwin Dalorzo Oct 23 '12 at 16:03
    
I never read that thing. But I did do some Java this summer and you can overload a method taking an Object with a method taking a Void object. –  xavierm02 Oct 23 '12 at 17:12
    
It's more of a class than a type. –  xavierm02 Oct 23 '12 at 17:13
2  
@xavierm02 Of course you can. You can overload a method in Java with whichever any other type that you want. That, nonetheless, has nothing to do with the question, or my answer. –  Edwin Dalorzo Oct 23 '12 at 18:58

You can assign a string to a null value so it is valid and the order for java and most programming languages is fit to the closest type and then to object.

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To answer the question in the title: null is neither a String nor an Object, but a reference to either can be assigned to null.

I'm actually surprised this code even compiles. I tried something similar previously and I got a compiler error saying that the call was ambiguous.

However, in this case, it seems like the compiler is choosing the method which is lowest on the food chain. It's assuming that you want the least generic version of the method in order to help you out.

I'll have to see if I can dig up the example where I got a compiler error in this (seemingly) exact same scenario, though...]

EDIT: I see. In the version I made, I had two overloaded methods accepting a String and an Integer. In this scenario, there is no "most specific" parameter (as in Object and String), so it can't choose between them, unlike in your code.

Very cool question!

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null is neither but it can be assigned to both, that is the difference and it will compile why wouldn't it - it's absolutely valid code. –  JonH Oct 23 '12 at 14:46

I would say neither. NULL is a state not a value. Check out this link for more info on this (the article applies to SQL, but I think it helps with your question as well).

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