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I'm working with a moderately large MSAccess .mdb file that I need to manipulate with SQL. Unfortunately some statements which work in theory seem to cause it to hang, and I've run into a brick wall.

Here is a simplified representation in SQL Fiddle

Three tables: products, product_category, and categories I need to SELECT categories that ONLY contain items that have the field 'HIDE = 1' If a category contains products that are hide = 0, it should not be selected.

I can do this relatively easily with subqueries, but the query stalls out. In the past queries that rely on left joins seem to execute efficiently, but I cannot wrap my mind around joins enough to translate this query into that format.

EDIT:

SELECT c.categoryid 
FROM product_category AS c
      LEFT JOIN
      (
          SELECT DISTINCT c.categoryid 
          FROM  product_category AS c
                LEFT JOIN products AS p 
                  ON c.catalogid = p.catalogid
          WHERE p.hide = 0
      )    y ON y.categoryid = c.categoryid

WHERE y.categoryid IS NULL

Someone posted the above query as an answer but then for some reason deleted it. As far as I can tell it works and works quickly. I consider this question to be answered. If I remember I will self-post the answer once the timer allows me to.

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2 Answers 2

I believe you just need to un-correlate the subquery eg...

SELECT c.categoryid FROM product_category AS c
WHERE c.categoryid NOT IN 

(SELECT DISTINCT c1.categoryid FROM product_category AS c1
LEFT JOIN products AS p ON c1.catalogid = p.catalogid
WHERE p.hide = 0)

Note how I have aliased the subquery product_category table as c1 instead of c - This means the subquery will only execute once as opposed to once for every row of the your main query.

SQL Fiddle

Note that there will no doubt be more efficiencies still to be found however I think this will suffice for your purposes.

In fact there is no need for a LEFT JOIN here I don't think ie...

SELECT c.categoryid FROM product_category AS c
WHERE c.categoryid NOT IN 

(SELECT DISTINCT c1.categoryid FROM product_category AS c1
INNER JOIN products AS p ON c1.catalogid = p.catalogid
WHERE p.hide = 0)

..This will afford you some extra speed.

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Oh I wish that that would have solved it. Still stalls out. Someone else had posted a query that seems to be a winner, but then deleted it as an answer. I posted it as an edit to the original question. –  Nelluk Oct 23 '12 at 15:22
    
Oh dear I'm sorry. I noticed there were a number of deleted answers. How many rows are we talking about in these tables? –  El Ronnoco Oct 23 '12 at 15:31
    
And at what stage did speed become an issue? –  El Ronnoco Oct 23 '12 at 15:33
    
For day-to-day use speed isn't an issue, it is for special custom projects like this where I run into problems. The product_category table has probably 150,000 rows –  Nelluk Oct 23 '12 at 15:40
    
Changing the LEFT JOIN to an INNER JOIN didn't make any noticeable difference. How do I view deleted answers? The one I posted in the edit seems perfect –  Nelluk Oct 23 '12 at 15:40

If there is only one categoryid per catalogid then you can get rid of the distinct:

Select
  c.id, c.categoryname
From
  category c
Where
  Not Exists (
    Select 
      'x'
    From 
      products p
        Inner Join
      product_category pc
        on pc.catalogid = p.catalogid
    Where
      pc.categoryid = c.id and
      p.hide = 0
  )

Edited - the test data in the fiddle seems wrong, I've corrected it. This should work now

http://sqlfiddle.com/#!6/56f5e/1/0

share|improve this answer
    
removing the product_category from the Exists query should benefit performance by not hitting this table twice. –  JeffO Oct 23 '12 at 19:32
    
Wouldn't that produce the wrong results faster? –  Laurence Oct 23 '12 at 21:23

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