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Given a parent + reference tables where Reference table is as follows

Ref_ID    PARENT_ID    
-------------------
1           1            
2           1            
1           2       
3           2       
1           3       
3           3       
4           3       
2           4       
3           4       

I'm trying to return all distinct parent rows where ref_id contains both 2 & 3

The query

SELECT *
FROM  Parent 
WHERE parent_id in (SELECT parent_id from XRefTable where ref_id in (2, 3) )

returns all parent_id 1, 2, 3, 4

WHEREAS the correct result required is to return parent_id 4 which has BOTH ref_id's 2 & 3, others have EITHER 2 OR 3

Any help is appreciated

FYI - there are 4-7 tables in the query (depending on user selections) so performance is a huge factor

SORRY cannot use stored procedures as it has to work on SQL Server CE too

share|improve this question
    
how many distinct ref_id values are there? Also how many distinct parent_id values? Also do you expect these to grow over time? –  Tobsey Oct 24 '12 at 16:09
    
@Tobsey these are user-defined - both by definition and for selection –  Kumar Oct 24 '12 at 17:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted
 SELECT parent_id 
 from XRefTable 
 where ref_id in ( 2, 3 ) 
 group by PARENT_ID 
 having count(distinct ref_id) = 2
share|improve this answer
    
looks good, any thoughts on optimizing it, the complete query is something like SELECT * from ParentTable WHERE parent_id in ( .....<the query above>.... ) which is currently giving a cost of 0.0048914 in the sample data with all relevant columns indexed to the query –  Kumar Oct 24 '12 at 14:08
    
Sorry, currently I don't have an idea to improve the speed furthermore. –  juergen d Oct 24 '12 at 15:21

You could do this:

SELECT 
    ParentReference.Parent_ID
FROM
    ParentReference
    INNER JOIN ParentReference B ON ParentReference.Parent_ID = B.Parent_ID AND ParentReference.Ref_ID = 2 AND B.Ref_ID = 3
share|improve this answer
    
interesting idea but quickly becomes unwieldy when the query becomes ref_id in (2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, ....) –  Kumar Oct 24 '12 at 13:57

You are trying to do a set-wise comparison. For this, I strongly recommend the group by and having clauses:

select parent_id
from Reference r
group by parent_id
having sum(case when ref_id = 2 then 1 else 0 end) > 0 and
       sum(case when ref_id = 3 then 1 else 0 end) > 0

Each component of the having clause is counting one of the fields. The logic requires that both are present.

The reason that I prefer this approach over others is because you can change the logic, using essentially the same structure.

If you have the list in a comma delimited string, the following will work. Perhaps not "elegant" and "relational", but it works:

set @Ref_ids = "1,2,3,4"

select parent_id
from Reference r
where charindex(','+cast(ref_id as varchar(255))+',', '+@ref_ids+',') > 0
group by parent_id
having count(distinct ref_id) = (len(replace(@ref_ids, ',', '')) - len(@ref_ids))+1

This is doing string manipulation to determine whether the ref_id is in the list. The having clause then counts the number of matches, making sure that it is the same size as the list. This will work, assuming there are no spaces in the list and no blank values.

share|improve this answer
    
interesting idea but quickly becomes unwieldy when the query becomes ref_id in (2, 3, 5, 7, 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, ....) –  Kumar Oct 24 '12 at 14:00
1  
How is your list of ref_ids being stored? –  Gordon Linoff Oct 24 '12 at 15:00
    
The table is defined like above, the list of ref_ids is generated based on user input where clicking on an item in a UI list updates the results on the screen from this query, furthermore, the items in the list are also user defined so we really have no idea of how many items could potentially be in the query/ref_ids, hence the comment –  Kumar Oct 24 '12 at 15:58
    
Are you storing the list in a string (presumably comma delimited) or in a table? –  Gordon Linoff Oct 24 '12 at 16:50
    
No, the ref_id in ( .... ) is generated based on user input and not persisted at all –  Kumar Oct 24 '12 at 17:59

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