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If I have two classes, which are derived from a base-class, how can I write a generic method, that can manipulate the inherited properties of both classes, so I do not need to write two methods...

abstract class BaseClass
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string slug { get; set; }
}

public class State:BaseClass
{
    public string StateName{ get; set; }
    public string Description { get; set; }
}

public class City:BaseClass
{
    public string TownName { get; set; }
    public string someOtherProperty{ get; set; }

}

THE "generic" Method:

public string Slugify( ?????BaseClass???? record)
{
    return record.slug = "...return...something...";
}

invoked like:

string a = Slugify(my_State_object); <--- not working
string b = Slugify(my_City_object);  <--- not working

Thank you!

EDIT: State and City are EF-CodeFirst Classes. Initially both had Id and slug - fields.

then I made these into a base class, as I have those in both (and other) tables.

I want a method that returns slug like:

public string Slugify(string p, System.Data.Entity.DbSet<Models.BaseRecords> dbSet){ return ...}

called like

Slugify(text, my_State_object);

as well as

Slugify(otherText, my_City_object);

both calls give me a "...some invalid arguments..." error.

Sorry, this is translated from german VS2010

share|improve this question
1  
Why can't you just use BaseClass as the type of the parameter? –  Drew Noakes Oct 23 '12 at 15:48
    
Please elaborate, does the Slugify method require access to the derived class properties? At the moment it only access slug, which is a member of the base class and thus, perfectly legal. –  MattDavey Oct 23 '12 at 15:48
2  
Define "not working" and we can possibly help you. –  Jesse C. Slicer Oct 23 '12 at 15:49
    
Are you getting a compilation error or are you just getting back unexpected results? –  m-y Oct 23 '12 at 15:49
    
Please don't use tags in the title: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/19190/… –  Lirik Oct 23 '12 at 16:04

5 Answers 5

You already gave the answer:

public string Slugify(BaseClass record)
{
    return record.slug = "...return...something...";
}

The issue is that your BaseClass should be as accessible as its children. Make it public and it will be fine:

public abstract class BaseClass ...
share|improve this answer
2  
Whilst that's correct, there should be a compile time error in OP's code. Their abstract base class is less accessible than the children. –  keyboardP Oct 23 '12 at 15:54

It's because your abstract base class is not public and so it is less accessible than its children. Change it to this:

public abstract class BaseClass
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string slug { get; set; }
}

The rest of the code is fine.

share|improve this answer

I'm under the assumption that how you generate a slug is different for each type. State would be based upon the StateName property, while City would use the TownName property.

I think this might be a better approach:

public abstract class BaseClass
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public abstract string Slug { get; }
}

public class State:BaseClass
{
    public string StateName{ get; set; }
    public abstract string Slug 
    {
        get 
        {
            return Regex.Replace(StateName, '[^a-zA-Z0-9]', '-');
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

what keeps you from simply accessing the properties of the baseclass?

Class A
{
    public string Rawr {get; set;}
}

Class B : A
{
    public string Rawr2 { get { return Rawr; } set { Rawr = value; } }
}

var b = new B();
b.Rawr = "asdf"

Console.WriteLine(b.Rawr2);
share|improve this answer

Try this:

BaseClass baseClass = new BaseClass();
baseClass.slug = "initial value";
Console.WriteLine(baseClass.slug); // displays "initial value"
Slugify(baseClass);
Console.WriteLine(baseClass.slug); // displays "...return...something..."

State state = new State();
state.slug = "initial value";
Console.WriteLine(state.slug); // displays "initial value"
Slugify(state);
Console.WriteLine(state.slug); // displays "...return...something..."

You should see that your Slugify method can already change properties in the BaseClass and State classes, as long as you get rid of the question marks:

public string Slugify(BaseClass record)  
{
    return record.slug = "...return...something...";  
}
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