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How can I use the nth-of-type css selector on <span> elements that are contained within the <li> elements of a <ul>?

I would have expected span:nth-of-type(odd) and span:nth-of-type(even) to work but they did not.

The page in question is below:

<style>
  span:nth-of-type(even) {
    background-color: grey;
  }

  span:nth-of-type(odd) {
    background-color: blue;
  }
</style>
<ul>
    <li>
<span>Test 1</span>
    </li>
    <li>
<span> 2 Test</span>
    </li>
</ul>

<br>
Should look like this:
<br>
<span>Test 1</span>
<br>
<span> 2 Test</span>

Here is a JSFiddle to show the issue in action.

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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You have to do it like this:

li:nth-of-type(odd) > span {}
li:nth-of-type(even) > span {}

The selector nth-of-type (and also first-child, last-child or nth-child) refer to their parents. In this case the parent is the <li>-tag. So both <span>s are odd elements as both are the first-child element. And both get selected the way you defined the CSS-rule. The CSS-rule here selects their parents as they can be alternating and sets the style for the children accordingly.

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You expanded your answer, mine is a duplicate now so removing it. –  Rick Calder Oct 23 '12 at 15:53
    
What do you mean by "all selectors are related to their parents"? –  BoltClock Oct 23 '12 at 18:35
    
@BoltClock Maybe this was bad wording. What I wanted to say is actually, that nth-child or nth-of-type mean "the nth child of a parent", not the "nth element within the scope of the body". That's why the <span> is always the "first child" within the <li>s. –  insertusernamehere Oct 24 '12 at 8:32
    
In that case, you probably meant to refer to those nth selectors, and not just "all selectors". –  BoltClock Oct 24 '12 at 8:34
    
@BoltClock That's true, maybe someone could take it too general. I have updated my answer. Thanks for pointing that out. –  insertusernamehere Oct 24 '12 at 8:53
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The nth elements you're looking to count are the <li> elements, not the <span> elements. There's no reason to use nth-of-type over nth-child, because <ul> elements can only contain <li> elements as children:

li:nth-child(even) > span {
    background-color: gray;
}
li:nth-child(odd) > span {
    background-color: blue;
}
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