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here's my getter:

public function __get($field)
    {
    	if ($field == 'userId'):
    		return $this->uid;
    	else:
    		return $this->fields[$field];
    	endif;
    }

here's my constructor

public function __construct()
    {
    	$this->uid = null;
    	$this->fields = array(
    		'username' => '',
    		'password' => '',
    		'firstname' => '',
    		'lastname' => '',
    		'email' => '',
    		'is_active' => false
    	);
    		$this->session = Session::Instance();
    		$this->profiler = new Profiler();
    		$this->encrypt = new Encrypt();
    }

everytime i access this function:

private function handle_pass($password, $username=null, $encrypt=true)
    {
    	if ($encrypt) :
    		return $this->encrypt->encode($password);
    	else:
    		$query = ORM::factory('user');
    		$result = $query
    			->select('password')
    			->where('username', $username)
    			->find();
    		$compare_pass = $this->encrypt->decode($password);
    		return ($compare_pass === $result->password);
    	endif;
    }

i get this error

application/libraries/User.php: Undefined index: encrypt // this is the error message
application/libraries/User.php:User->__get( encrypt ) // this is the last method executed
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2 Answers 2

Is encrypt defined as a public variable in the class? If not, the logic of your __get() function demands that it be read from $this->fields['encrypt'], which is never set, and is what's producing that error.

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let's say I have an encrypt class I want to call from this class. How do I do that? I have tried $this->encrypt = new Encrypt but I guess the class interprets it as one of ist attributes. –  Ygam Aug 20 '09 at 1:14
    
Let's be clear: the Encrypt class is irrelevant here. The problem is the encrypt (correctly lowercase) instance variable. You must declare that property as either public $encrypt; or protected $encrypt; (depending on what visibility you want it to have). –  VoteyDisciple Aug 20 '09 at 1:16
    
$this->encrypt = new Encrypt() is perfectly valid. The encrypt property should be an instance of Encrypt. –  Mike B Aug 20 '09 at 1:16
    
Of course it's perfectly valid; I've made no claim to the contrary. The property should still be declared as either public or private. –  VoteyDisciple Aug 20 '09 at 1:30

Use get_object_vars on the object before attempting to access the encrypt property to see if it really exists. Something else could be going on.

var_dump(get_object_vars($myClass));

Edit:

After looking at your code. The get() method should never be called since it is only invoked when a referenced property is inaccessible. Are you declaring $encrypt as private? Are you declaring it at all? What makes you think get() should be invoked? (Formatter goes crazy when I try to put underscores infront of get() with a link).

class myClass()
{
  public $encrypt;

  public function __construct() 
  {
    $this->encrypt = new Encrypt();
  }

  public function __get($property)
  {
    return $this->$property;
  }

  public function handle_pass()
  {
    $this->encrypt->decode(); 
    // Since $encrypt is public, __get() will not be invoked
  }
}
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will do...but first i'll try adding the encryt class instantiation in the __get magic method...hope it works –  Ygam Aug 20 '09 at 1:17

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