Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am protecting pointer with mutex for writes already like this

// thread1
if(pointer)
{
   boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(pointer_mutex);
   if(pointer)
      pointer->DoStuff();
}

// thread2
if(pointer)
{
   boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(pointer_mutex);
   if(pointer)
      pointer = anotherPointer;
}

// thread3
if(pointer)
{
   boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(pointer_mutex);
   pointer = 0;
}

i do not want want to put that mutex outside of the block, because pointer is null 99.999 of the time.

this works fine with no crashes, but i not experienced enough declare it thread safe.

my question is:

Are if(pointer) pointer = 0; pointer = anotherPointer; atomic?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
how is it safe? what happens if thread1 sees the pointer is not null, then waits for the lock held by thread3 which is turning it null? –  CashCow Oct 23 '12 at 16:12
    
@CashCow sorry for the confusion. fixed it now –  mikbal Oct 23 '12 at 16:20
    
lol. I thought I had read it wrong. I answered one way and then reread the question and thought I was crazy. –  Rafael Baptista Oct 23 '12 at 16:21
    
If the pointer is null 99.999 of time, why are you polling it? Why are you not just queueing the pointer and signaling? –  Martin James Oct 23 '12 at 16:27
    
@MartinJames i had signalling before this method, thing is it caused a deadlock with boost::asio. i couldnt find the solution, frustrated and gave up. i think i need to learn more about asio. –  mikbal Oct 23 '12 at 16:39

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's not safe and neither is "double-checked locking". Please do read this paper.

share|improve this answer
    
didnt even know this had a name, thanks! –  mikbal Oct 23 '12 at 16:18
1  
It's a nice read, but unfortunately it makes no mention of the new C++11 memory model and its "happens-before" and "synchronises-with" relationships. Maybe one day there'll be an updated version... –  Kerrek SB Oct 23 '12 at 16:19

It's formally illegal, since you're introducing a data race. And I'm not just talking about some subtle non-atomic read, but very simply another thread could have been manipulating the pointer between your check and the acquisition of your lock.

However, here's a way to feel at least a little bit better about this atrocity:

if (pointer)  // dirty read, eek
{
    boost::mutex::scoped_lock lock(pointer_mutex);
    if (pointer) { pointer = 0; }  // reliable
}
share|improve this answer
    
What's the use of first check, assuming ' pointer is non-null 99.999 of the time' –  Lol4t0 Oct 23 '12 at 16:08
    
@Lol4t0 that was a mistake sorry, pointer is actually null most of the time –  mikbal Oct 23 '12 at 16:10
1  
The suggestion in this answer is called "double-checked locking" and is more dangerous than it looks. Please see my answer. –  Tilman Vogel Oct 23 '12 at 16:12
    
@TilmanVogel: I didn't say it was fine. I believe I did use the word "illegal" :-) –  Kerrek SB Oct 23 '12 at 16:13

I would put the mutex outside of the block.

I don't know the internals of boost::mutex, but I assume it is written in a sane manner. A mutex lock/unlock can be implemented in about 10 cycles. It really won't be that big of a performance issue to lock it always.

For multi-threading you really want your system to be thread safe 100% of the time. There are lots of times when in test a MT system will appear to run fine 100% of the time, but with a slightly different usage pattern or different amount of load problems start happening. And MT crashes can be really hard to debug as the error can happen in one thread but crash a different thread.

@edit: is your performance concern that you want multiple threads to be able to use the pointer, but just one thread at a time to be able to change it? If so, use a read/write lock. Multiple threads can read but just one thread can write and will exclude readers.

The overhead of the read/write lock is a little bigger than just a straight mutex, but is more than made up by the fact that multiple threads can "doStuff". And put the read write lock outside the block.

share|improve this answer
    
that is good idea. i will test both cases will use the faster one. thank you –  mikbal Oct 23 '12 at 16:22

(originally the OP did not check the pointer again in thread1 after gaining the mutex, which meant it might have been turned null by thread3).

However even with the fix, there is a possibility that the compiler will over-optimise and "cache" the value it sees in the check. (Double-checked locking issue).

With regards to the question, there will be atomic versions in C++11.

if( pointer )
    pointer == 0;

is not atomic. pointer could change between these calls.

The problem with doing this

if( pointer )
{
     mutex_lock lock( mutex );
     if( pointer )
     {
         pointer = 0;
     }
}

is more of telling the compiler not to "optimise" and to recognise that pointer might have changed between when you first checked it and when you check it the second time.

There are ways you can try to outwit the compiler. The most obvious way is to use the volatile keyword although the standard sadly does not enforce the compiler to obey it. You could use a function that returns pointer and make that function virtual or something similar to prevent the compiler inlining it.

Or you can do down the extreme path of using assembly for this situation.

Incidentally, if the situation calls for it, use boost::once.

share|improve this answer
    
actually my code is over simplistic. there is a check for null after mutex gain. like Kerrek SB's answer. i just wanted to know how atomic pointer read and write was. I apologize for the confusion. –  mikbal Oct 23 '12 at 16:18
1  
Note: the OP fixed the issue that I had commented on... –  CashCow Oct 23 '12 at 16:37
1  
which idiot gave me an anonymous downvote who hadn't even followed the history of the question and the answer? –  CashCow Oct 24 '12 at 9:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.