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I'm using jquery data() to attach the name of a div I'd like to show when another div (.panel_button) is clicked. I'm doing the attaching of this div's id to the button when the document is ready. Is this an okay way to do this? Or is it too resource intensive and unprofessional-looking?

$(document).ready(function(){

    $('#sample_button').data('panel', 'sample_kit_container');
    $('#mail_button').data('panel', 'mail_container');
    $('#mbillboard_button').data('panel', 'mbillboard_container');

    $('.panel_button').on('click', function(){

        $('.secondary_panel').hide();
        var panel = $(this).data('panel');
        $('#' + panel).show();

    });

});
share|improve this question
    
Seems unnecessary. I'd just use the id. $("#" + this.id.replace("_button", "_container")).show(); Just standardize the pairs. Right now the _kit is breaking the pattern. –  I Hate Lazy Oct 23 '12 at 16:11
1  
I don't really feel the need to add a full fledged answer to this. Yes, this is a good way to make use of datasets (esentially what .data uses). I'll urge you to cache your selectors though ;) –  Marcus Ekwall Oct 23 '12 at 16:12
1  
I'll agree with user1689607. You could do it your way, but if you get rid of the _kit thingy, a simple replace would be a lot easier, more scalable and probably faster. –  adeneo Oct 23 '12 at 16:15
1  
@user1689607 much easier. thank you. –  thomas Oct 23 '12 at 16:16
1  
@user1689607 Oh yeah you're right. Was confusing .data()'s ability to parse data attributes with the usage of datasets. Thanks for pointing that out! –  Marcus Ekwall Oct 23 '12 at 16:22

3 Answers 3

Yeah, that should work just fine. As an alternate, you could store the actual element itself (assuming it already exists) rather than finding it each time:

$('#sample_button').data('panel', $('#sample_kit_container'));
$('#mail_button').data('panel', $('#mail_container'));
$('#mbillboard_button').data('panel', $('#mbillboard_container'));

$('.panel_button').on('click', function(){

    $('.secondary_panel').hide();
    var panel = $(this).data('panel');
    panel.show();

});
share|improve this answer
    
Good idea. Thank you very much. –  thomas Oct 23 '12 at 16:16

Another option would be to store the actual jQuery element in the data property, so no need to do a second selection:

$(function(){

   $('#sample_button').data('panel', $('#sample_kit_container'));
   $('#mail_button').data('panel', $('#mail_container'));
   $('#mbillboard_button').data('panel', $('#mbillboard_container'));

    $('.panel_button').on('click', function(){

        $('.secondary_panel').hide();
        var panel = $(this).data('panel');
        panel.show();

    });

});
share|improve this answer
1  
Doesn't this risk DOM cycles? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Oct 23 '12 at 16:17
    
Not sure, can you explain? The selector will be cached, so I only see this as as an improvement –  Justin Bicknell Oct 23 '12 at 16:23
1  
This is great way to use .data(). But I'll suggest creating variables for each of the jQuery objects, to better illustrate the reference that is stored. –  Marcus Ekwall Oct 23 '12 at 16:26
2  
I think @LightnessRacesinOrbit is referring to potential memory leaks. If one of the containers is removed from the DOM, it is still referenced in jQuery.cache, so it can't be cleaned up unless its corresponding button is properly discarded. IMO, .data() is just one big leak waiting to happen. –  I Hate Lazy Oct 23 '12 at 16:29
1  
@user1689607 This shouldn't be an issue since the data is associated with the DOM node in memory. Once the node is removed, so is the data. At least that's how it's supposed to work ;) –  Marcus Ekwall Oct 23 '12 at 16:32

@thomas, in my opnion, your solution is actually better than those in the other answers.

Including the whole object inside the data attribute may not always work. For example, what if the $('#sample_kit_container') object doesn't exist on load, but rather ofter an ajax load.

...

Only one tiny comment! why don't you call the data object: panelId. It would be more a bit intuitive.

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heheh. good point. fixed. thanks –  thomas Oct 23 '12 at 16:22

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