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I have this low level for loop I've written in C that a friend suggested I write in CUDA. I've set up my CUDA enviroment and have been looking at the docs, but i'm still struggling with the syntax for what's been well over 2 weeks now. Can anyone help me out? What would this look like in CUDA?

float* red = new float [N];
float* green = new float [N];
float* blue = new float [N];

for (int y = 0; y < h; y++)
{
    // Get row ptr from the color image
    const unsigned char* src = rowptr<unsigned char>(color, 0, y, w);

    // Get row ptrs for the destination channel features
    float* rptr = rowptr<float>(red, 0, y, w);
    float* gptr = rowptr<float>(green, 0, y, w);
    float* bptr = rowptr<float>(blue, 0, y, w);

    for (int x = 0; x < w; x++)
    {
        *rptr++ = (float)*src++;
        *gptr++ = (float)*src++;
        *bptr++ = (float)*src++;
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
the loop isn't doing much, basically transferring a bunch of floats from one place to another with essentially no algorithmic processing. Such an operation is not likely to achieve interesting speedups using the GPU. If you have other operations to perform, and this is merely the precursor, there might be some sense in it. Without knowing how rowptr<...> is defined, any answer I could come up with would be speculative. – Robert Crovella Oct 23 '12 at 19:46
1  
You should at least attempt to solve this yourself before asking. If you have attempted, then provide the CUDA code you wrote and ask questions about why it works. "Port this code for me" questions don't attract helpful answers on SO... – harrism Oct 23 '12 at 22:11
    
@Robert, the operation is eminently data parallel; GPUs have much higher memory bandwidth than CPUs; and they can operate concurrently with the CPU. I don't see why this operation wouldn't be a good candidate for GPU acceleration. – ArchaeaSoftware Oct 24 '12 at 13:59
    
@ArchaeaSoftware, my answer was predicated on whether or not this code sample represents the complete problem or not. If it is the complete problem, then copying a bunch of floats from one location in GPU memory to another location in GPU memory will certainly be fast, but the cost to first instantiate that data on the GPU (i.e. copy from host to device, or even just device to host) would outweigh any benefit of GPU memory bandwidth. As I stated, if there is more to the problem than just this, it might make sense. Anyway, feel free to post an answer and educate me. – Robert Crovella Oct 24 '12 at 16:00
    
Can someone at least tell me how to write "float* red = new float [N];" in CUDA? – user1161310 Oct 24 '12 at 16:27
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is some sample code. I don't know if it will really answer your questions. Probably you will need to learn more about CUDA. If you can spare the time, taking this webinar and this webinar from the nvidia webinar page would be 2 hours well spent. Also the cuda C programmers manual is a good readable reference.

#include <stdio.h>

#define N      256
#define NUMROW   N
#define NUMCOL   N
#define PIXSIZE  3
#define REDOFF   0
#define GREENOFF 1
#define BLUEOFF  2
#define nTPB    16
#define GRNVAL   5
#define REDVAL   7
#define BLUVAL   9

#define cudaCheckErrors(msg) \
    do { \
        cudaError_t __err = cudaGetLastError(); \
        if (__err != cudaSuccess) { \
            fprintf(stderr, "Fatal error: %s (%s at %s:%d)\n", \
                msg, cudaGetErrorString(__err), \
                __FILE__, __LINE__); \
            fprintf(stderr, "*** FAILED - ABORTING\n"); \
            exit(1); \
        } \
    } while (0)

__global__ void kern(const unsigned numrow, const unsigned numcol, const unsigned char* src, float* rptr, float* gptr, float* bptr){

  unsigned idx = threadIdx.x + (blockDim.x*blockIdx.x);
  unsigned idy = threadIdx.y + (blockDim.y*blockIdx.y);
  if ((idx < numcol) && (idy < numrow)){

    rptr[(idy*numcol)+idx] = (float)src[(((idy*numcol)+idx)*PIXSIZE)+REDOFF];
    gptr[(idy*numcol)+idx] = (float)src[(((idy*numcol)+idx)*PIXSIZE)+GREENOFF];
    bptr[(idy*numcol)+idx] = (float)src[(((idy*numcol)+idx)*PIXSIZE)+BLUEOFF];
    }
}

int main (){

  float *h_red, *h_green, *h_blue;
  float *d_red, *d_green, *d_blue;
  unsigned char *h_img, *d_img;

  if ((h_img =(unsigned char*)malloc(NUMROW*NUMCOL*PIXSIZE*sizeof(unsigned char))) == 0) {printf("malloc fail\n"); return 1;}
  if ((h_red =(float*)malloc(NUMROW*NUMCOL*sizeof(float))) == 0) {printf("malloc fail\n"); return 1;}
  if ((h_green =(float*)malloc(NUMROW*NUMCOL*sizeof(float))) == 0) {printf("malloc fail\n"); return 1;}
  if ((h_blue =(float*)malloc(NUMROW*NUMCOL*sizeof(float))) == 0) {printf("malloc fail\n"); return 1;}

  cudaMalloc((void **)&d_img, (NUMROW*NUMCOL*PIXSIZE)*sizeof(unsigned char));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudaMalloc1 fail");
  cudaMalloc((void **)&d_red, (NUMROW*NUMCOL)*sizeof(float));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudaMalloc2 fail");
  cudaMalloc((void **)&d_green, (NUMROW*NUMCOL)*sizeof(float));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudaMalloc3 fail");
  cudaMalloc((void **)&d_blue, (NUMROW*NUMCOL)*sizeof(float));
  cudaCheckErrors("cudaMalloc4 fail");

  for (int i=0; i<NUMROW*NUMCOL; i++){
    h_img[(i*PIXSIZE)+ REDOFF]   = REDVAL;
    h_img[(i*PIXSIZE)+ GREENOFF] = GRNVAL;
    h_img[(i*PIXSIZE)+ BLUEOFF]  = BLUVAL;
    }

  cudaMemcpy(d_img, h_img, (NUMROW*NUMCOL*PIXSIZE)*sizeof(unsigned char), cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudaMemcpy1 fail");

  dim3 block(nTPB, nTPB);
  dim3 grid(((NUMCOL+nTPB-1)/nTPB),((NUMROW+nTPB-1)/nTPB));
  kern<<<grid,block>>>(NUMROW, NUMCOL, d_img, d_red, d_green, d_blue);
  cudaMemcpy(h_red, d_red, (NUMROW*NUMCOL)*sizeof(float), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudaMemcpy2 fail");
  cudaMemcpy(h_green, d_green, (NUMROW*NUMCOL)*sizeof(float), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudaMemcpy3 fail");
  cudaMemcpy(h_blue, d_blue, (NUMROW*NUMCOL)*sizeof(float), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  cudaCheckErrors("cudaMemcpy4 fail");

  for (int i=0; i<(NUMROW*NUMCOL); i++){
    if (h_red[i] != REDVAL) {printf("Red mismatch at offset %d\n", i); return 1;}
    if (h_green[i] != GRNVAL) {printf("Green mismatch at offset %d\n", i); return 1;}
    if (h_blue[i] != BLUVAL) {printf("Blue mismatch at offset %d\n", i); return 1;}
    }
  printf("Success!\n");
  return 0;
}

In response to a question posed in the comments, here is a modified kernel that shows how to use the rowptr<> template as defined in the comments. Just replace the kernel code above with this:

template <typename T> T* rowptr(T* start, int x, int y, int w) __device__ __host__ { return start + y*w + x; }

__global__ void kern(const unsigned numrow, const unsigned numcol, unsigned char* isrc, float* rptr, float* gptr, float* bptr){


  unsigned idx = threadIdx.x + (blockDim.x*blockIdx.x);
  unsigned idy = threadIdx.y + (blockDim.y*blockIdx.y);
  if ((idx < numcol) && (idy < numrow)){
    unsigned char *src = rowptr<unsigned char>(isrc, (idx*PIXSIZE), idy, (numcol*PIXSIZE));

    rptr[(idy*numcol)+idx] = (float)*src++;
    gptr[(idy*numcol)+idx] = (float)*src++;
    bptr[(idy*numcol)+idx] = (float)*src;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are awesome. – user1161310 Oct 26 '12 at 16:50
    
Rob, one last thing. This is how rowptr is defined, how would that change the loop? template <typename T> T* rowptr(T* start, int x, int y, int w) { return start + y*w + x; } – user1161310 Oct 26 '12 at 20:01
    
Note that there is no loop anymore, at least not in the device code. Anyway I've updated the answer with an example of how to use the rowptr<> template in the device code. Note that I had to modify your template definition slightly to make it usable either in device code or host code. – Robert Crovella Oct 26 '12 at 21:21
    
Thanks so much. I have a question though, it seems like you aren't allocating the following 3 pointers in the cuda kernel though? float* rptr = rowptr<float>(red, 0, y, w); float* gptr = rowptr<float>(green, 0, y, w); float* bptr = rowptr<float>(blue, 0, y, w); – user1161310 Oct 26 '12 at 22:25
    
You could set up rptr, gptr, and bptr in a fashion similar to the way I have set up src in the kernel (derived from isrc). There is enough information and an example of how to do it, so I think you should be able to modify it that way if you want. My objective is not to write your code for you, but give you enough syntactical examples so you can figure it out. Something like this: float *rptr = rowptr<float>(irptr, idx, idy, numcol); – Robert Crovella Oct 26 '12 at 22:38

Since this code is a simple for loop, instead of writing CUDA, another option is to check out openACC. This way you only need to add directive to your existing code.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you at least tell me how to write "float* red = new float [N];" in CUDA? – user1161310 Oct 24 '12 at 18:26

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