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I know that fortran has the concept of a generic procedure allowing users to define several specific procedures and collecting their interfaces in an interface block. What is not clear to me however is whether it is possible to remove code duplication by only having one implementation of a generic function.

As an example consider the intrinsic SIN function. It can accept both real and double precision arguments. Does this mean there are two implementations say SIN_REAL and SIN_DOUBLE_PRECISION with exactly the same code?

Apologies for the naive question, I am a fortran beginner. Thanks for reading.

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2 Answers 2

I finally found a discussion which summarizes the state of things: http://compgroups.net/comp.lang.fortran/generic-procedures-still-involve-code-dupli/604846

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As an example consider the intrinsic SIN function. It can accept both real and double precision arguments. Does this mean there are two implementations say SIN_REAL and SIN_DOUBLE_PRECISION with exactly the same code?

Yes. But you can manage the common progamming part in putting this one in an include file.

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Is there an example of how to do this online somewhere? I searched quite hard and was unsuccessful. –  Scott Oct 23 '12 at 18:38
    
We use preprocessing with Coco to achieve something like this: bitbucket.org/haraldkl/treelm/src/… it implements some dynamic array for a given data type. In this module: bitbucket.org/haraldkl/treelm/src/… it is for example used to implement this data-structure for various intrinsic data types. In other places it is also used for derived data types. –  haraldkl Oct 25 '12 at 17:52

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