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I have a table with workouts with the following key columns:

workout_id      distance
1                       2.3
2                       3.1

Let's say I want to write a Rails active record query so that I get these columns plus a running total of the distance, like so:

workout_id      distance      running_total
1                       2.3                 2.3
2                       3.1                 5.4

How could I do such a thing?

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better do it after fetching the records! for cumulation you may need to rely on subqueries which will be slow! –  HungryCoder Oct 23 '12 at 17:50
    
Is there a way to do that within the object holding my records? Let's say that the returned records are stored in workouts, is there a way for me to add this running_total attribute to each record, basically mixing ActiveRecord and this temporary attribute? –  pejmanjohn Oct 23 '12 at 18:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I agree with HungryCoder that you should perhaps do it in the model rather than in a database query.

class Workout
  # ...
  attr_accessor :running_total
  class << self
    def distance_with_running_total
      total = 0.0
      Workout.order(:id).collect do |w|
        total += w.distance
        w.running_total = total
      end
    end
  end
  # ...
end

Then in the controller, simply do:

@workouts = Workout.distance_with_running_total
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Thanks. Good learning for me on avoiding heavy SQL where possible. –  pejmanjohn Oct 24 '12 at 23:00

To do it closer to the object, although this not being the most effective way, you could do for example:

<% Workout.all.map{|x| x.attributes}.each_with_index{|e, i| e["running_total"] = Workout.all.take(i + 1).map{|x| x.distance}.inject{|sum,x| sum + x}}.each do |workout| %>
    <%= workout["id"] %>
    <%= workout["distance"] %>
    <%= workout["running_total"] %>
<% end %>

But notice how many sql queries this is performing. Probably not your best solution. My code itself also probably could get optimized, but in general your approach might not be the best idea as others already pointed out.

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