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I have to perform ajax requests for a specific Array and wait for the server response before proceeding to the next iteration in the loop.

I currently have my iterations performed simultaneously. How do I proceed only after ensuring the success?

Thanks for any advice.

myArray.each(function(val, index) {
    new Ajax.Request(myUrl + val, {
        onSuccess: function() {
               responseFromServer();
        }
    });
    void(0);
});
share|improve this question
    
Are you using a framework which provides a promise API? here's an example of doing basically what you've asked. – Jim Schubert Oct 23 '12 at 18:11
    
@JimSchubert That doesn't really show how to queue them, just how to be notified when they're all finished. – Juan Mendes Oct 23 '12 at 18:17
    
@JuanMendes I think I misunderstood that Dee only wanted to wait for the success of all responses rather than performing each ajax request in serial only after the previous request has successfully completed. – Jim Schubert Oct 23 '12 at 18:58
up vote 1 down vote accepted

might try it like this

function getItem(url, array, index)
{
   new Ajax.Request(url + array[index])
   {
      onSuccess : function()
      {
        responseFromServer(); //assuming this handles the server response
        if (index < array.length)
           getItem(url, array, ++index);
      }
   }
}

then just call it with

getItem(myUrl, myrray, 0);

basically, you want the callback to start the next ajaxrequest, on the next item in your array

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer, the only thing you need to increase the value of the loop before: ++index – Dee Oct 30 '12 at 15:22
    
you're right, good catch. i'll edit the answer to reflext – speakingcode Oct 30 '12 at 16:14

You have to go to the next iteration only after the AJAX request is finished. I'll use jQuery to show an example;

function sendRequests(requests) {
    var value = requests.shift();
    $.ajax(myUrl + value).done(function(data){
        if (requests.length > 0) {
            sendRequests(requests);
        }
    });    
}

sendRequests( [1,2,3,4] );
share|improve this answer
    
Or, just: requests.length && sendRequests(requests); – nekman Oct 23 '12 at 18:20
    
@nekman Sure you could use that, but it's not clearer than what I have, my code is much more semantic the the trick you suggest. var a = b && b.c is acceptable in my mind. They way you're using it is actually prohibited by our style guideline since (for code clarity) you shouldn't have side effects within a boolean expression – Juan Mendes Oct 23 '12 at 18:49
    
I agree with you that it is clearer. I just tend to like one-liners in JS just "because you can" :). Anyway, nice solution on the actual question/problem! – nekman Oct 23 '12 at 19:01
1  
@nekman one-liners are for Perl, the "write once read never" language ;) – Juan Mendes Oct 23 '12 at 19:15

Try something like this. Basically, instead of iterating over all your elements, dequeue the first item from your array, and make the AJAX request. Then, when your request is completed successfully, you invoke the next item.

Note that in this example, the original array is mutated, which may or may not be OK in your case.

function invokeAll(myArray)
{
    var val = myArray.shift(); //get the next item to be processed
    if (!val)
        return;
    new Ajax.Request(myUrl + val, {
        onSuccess: function() {
               responseFromServer();
               invokeAll(myArray); //got a successful response, start the next one
        }
    });
}
share|improve this answer

You can write a class for this job, its processNext() function will process all items in array

var arrayProcessor = {
        values: [],
        process: function(arr) {
           arrayProcessor.values = arr;
           arrayProcessor.processNext();  
        },
        processNext: function(){
            if (arrayProcessor.values.length > 0) {
              new Ajax.Request(myUrl + arrayProcessor.values.shift(), {
                  onSuccess: function() {
                       responseFromServer();
                       arrayProcessor.processNext();  
                  }
              });
           }
        },

    }
share|improve this answer
    
What you have is not a class, it's a just a static object. – Juan Mendes Oct 23 '12 at 18:50
    
True, and as I know everything is an object in JavaScript – Elena Sharovar Oct 23 '12 at 20:11
    
That's true, but you can implement class like behavior using the prototype object, that's what's usually referred to as a class in JS. If you can't create multiple copies of your object, it's not a class. – Juan Mendes Oct 23 '12 at 20:15

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