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I am trying to extract table content from a html file using HTML::TableExtract. My problem is my html file is structured in the following way:


!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>

    <h4>One row and three columns:</h4>

    <table border="1">
      <tr>
        <td>
        <p> 100 </p></td>
        <td>
        <p> 200 </p></td>
        <td>
        <p> 300 </p></td>
        </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>
        <p> 100 </p></td>
        <td>
        <p> 200 </p></td>
        <td>
        <p> 300 </p></td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</body>

Because of this structure, my output looks like:


   100|

   200|

   300|

   400|

   500|

   600|

Instead of what I want:

   100|200|300|
   400|500|600|

Can you please help? Here is my perl code

use strict;
use warnings;
use HTML::TableExtract;

my $te = HTML::TableExtract->new();
$te->parse_file('Table_One.html');

open (DATA2, ">TableOutput.txt")
    or die "Can't open file";

foreach my $ts ($te->tables()) {

    foreach my $row ($ts->rows()) {

        my $Final = join('|', @$row );
    print DATA2 "$Final";
    }
}
close (DATA2);
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
sub trim(_) { my ($s) = @_; $s =~ s/^\s+//; $s =~ s/\s+\z//; $s }

Or in Perl 5.14+,

sub trim(_) { $_[0] =~ s/^\s+//r =~ s/\s+\z//r }

Then use:

my $Final = join '|', map trim, @$row;
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Why the parentheses? my ($s) –  Tim N Oct 23 '12 at 19:07
    
@Tim N, To force the use of the list assignment operator. Otherwise, it would be the same as my $s = 1;. –  ikegami Oct 23 '12 at 19:25
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Try doing this :

use strict;
use warnings;
use HTML::TableExtract;

my $te = HTML::TableExtract->new();
$te->parse_file('Table_One.html');

open (DATA2, ">TableOutput.txt") or die "Can't open file";
foreach my $ts ($te->tables() )
{
    foreach my $row ($ts->rows() )
    {
        s/(\n|\s)//g for @$row;
        my $Final = join('|', @$row );
        print DATA2 "$Final"; 
    }
}
close (DATA2);
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Great it works!! Thanks –  user1769222 Oct 23 '12 at 19:02
    
If you think that the answer is useful, you can 'upvote' it. You can 'accept' the reply too by clicking the outline of the checkmark (will be green), this way, people searching stackoverflow website will known that the question is well answered. That's how stackechange websites works, thanks ;) –  sputnick Oct 23 '12 at 19:11
    
Can you please look at the edited question? –  user1769222 Oct 23 '12 at 19:16
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Using Mojo::DOM

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Mojo::DOM;
my $dom = Mojo::DOM->new(<<'END');
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<body>

    <h4>One row and three columns:</h4>

    <table border="1">
      <tr>
        <td>
        <p> 100 </p></td>
        <td>
        <p> 200 </p></td>
        <td>
        <p> 300 </p></td>
        </tr>
      <tr>
        <td>
        <p> 100 </p></td>
        <td>
        <p> 200 </p></td>
        <td>
        <p> 300 </p></td>
        </tr>
    </table>
</body>
END

my $rows = $dom->find('table tr');
$rows->each(sub{ 
  print $_->find('td p')
          ->pluck('text')
          ->join('|') . "|\n"
});
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