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I have 2 databases in excel. In database A, I have the names of various companies, cities, and charities. Database B is the same. However Database B is filled out by the customer. As such, I get a lot of random mistakes and/or variations on the legal name.

What is the best way to match the names?

Here are some sample differences:

  1. City of ABC might show up as Corporation of the City of ABC
  2. ABC Corporation might just up as ABCcorporation (They forgot a space)
  3. University of ABC may be abbreviated as Univ of ABC
  4. Canadian Tire might show up as Canadian Tire Store #503
  5. Canadian Tire might be spelt wrong like Canadia Tire
  6. ABC Corp might show up as ABC Inc

Is there a good solution to this? I know this question is a bit of a long shot, but if I can do this I will have saved people in my company like thousands of hours each year...

Any advice will be greatly appreciated

share|improve this question
    
Databases in Excel? Why not use a real database, like Access? You can design forms for data entry that will actually enforce you to enter correct data. Invalid data is just not allowed. In Excel, you can type anything, anywhere. – GolezTrol Oct 23 '12 at 18:58
    
i think he means sheets. – FUD Oct 23 '12 at 19:01
    
@GolezTrol I can't do that. I'm too low level employee...the data comes to us in an excel file and they need us to match companies. I can export and work in different programs (and I can write scripts), but as it is, the data comes to me in an excel format and the customer fills it out as such as well. (Unfortunately) – Chowza Oct 23 '12 at 19:04
    
This is a very complex problem. Look up "master data management" and "dedup". This wikipedia article is a good starting point – Miserable Variable Oct 23 '12 at 19:05
    
@MiserableVariable :( Yup. I know it is, but after a year of looking for the same things constantly, it just seems like this is somethign an algorithm should be able to get right, at least with a consistency of maybe 90-95%...Also thanks for the wiki article I'll start some research there – Chowza Oct 23 '12 at 19:07
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This is a very complex problem. Look up "master data management" and "dedup". This wikipedia article is a good starting point.

The problem is best solved in small chunks. My recommendation is to read up a little and implement a tool that lists potential duplicates and some easy way to merge them. The keyword here is potential; you don't want to do wrong merges and false positives are very likely and very harmful.

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You could use regular expressions to filter these databases.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Regular_expression

http://www.zytrax.com/tech/web/regex.htm

You can have a program pattern match based on the relevant part of a company name. For example, If someone puts in Microsoft Corporation of Redmond, and your program pattern matches against 'Microsoft' you'd get a hit.

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