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I have a database that stores the location of some data. For simplicity, lets make it

Resource
----------
id (PK)
resourceLocation

In my application, which is written in Java, it has come to a point where all I have is the binary data of the file that is stored at resourceLocation. With just this binary data, I need some way to be able to get this record from the database.

The only thing I can think of is something like this. Add a new column to the Resource table called md5. This will store the MD5 of the file located at resourceLocation.

Resource
----------
id (PK)
resourceLocation
md5

Then in my code, when all I have is the binary data, I can simply get the MD5 of the data and be able to find the record in the database.

I had a couple of questions about this approach. First, can anyone think of a better way to do it. Second, is there a better hash algorithm than MD5 for this purpose. My concern is that I may wind up with 2 files creating the same MD5 hash. If that happens, my approach fails.

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3  
Your approach sounds good, assuming that you genuinely can't get the resourceLocation from within Java. Why is that? How did you come upon the file contents without the file's path? Or are you trying to see if a received file matches one already in the database? Probability of two files having colliding MD5 hashes should be 1 in 2^128 (approximately 340 trillion trillion trillion), although if this is for a security application one can create deliberately colliding files. Other hashing algorithms (e.g. SHA-1) are more secure, but I should think MD5 is more than enough for this purpose. –  eggyal Oct 23 '12 at 19:17
    
@eggyal,+1, wondering same here as how he'll come about the file without starting with the file location. Hashes are all well and good but to be somewhat absolutely sure, also salt your hash values if security is a huge concern. Another thing you'll have to consider eventually is the efficiency of your back-to-front approach for large files during hashing as hashing calculations degrade with payload size and system resources.You will have to decide between a faster or more efficient hashing algorithm eventually. Cheers –  kolossus Oct 25 '12 at 6:21

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