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I'm fairly new to Python, and was wondering how would I be able to control the decimal precision of any given number without using any the decimal module or floating points (eg: " %4f" %n).

Examples (edit):

input(2/7)

0.28571428571....

input(1/3)

0.33333333333333....

and I wanted them to thousand decimal points or any decimal point for that matter. I was thinking of using a while as a controlled loop, but I'm not really sure how to do so. Thanks

edit: The reason why I'm not using the decimal module is just so I can conceptualize the algorithm/logic behind these type of things. Just trying to really understand the logic behind things.

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7  
Why can't you use the decimal module? It's part of the standard library –  Daenyth Oct 23 '12 at 19:12
    
Could you fill out your example more? It's not clear if those are inputs or outputs, or what the output is supposed to look like if those are inputs. –  Brendan Long Oct 23 '12 at 19:13
4  
Also unclear: "thousand decimal points". Do you mean 1000 digits after the decimal? Or 3 digits after the decimal? –  jwpat7 Oct 23 '12 at 19:18
4  
"conceptualize the algorithm/logic behind these type of things" - so you've never done long division on paper before? –  Eric Oct 23 '12 at 19:28
    
I don't get it: First you're asking how this could be done "conceptually", and then you accept an answer that doesn't really show an algorithm, but transcribes the problem from an unlimited precision decimal built-in to an unlimited precision integer built-in. Where's the learning here? - Don't get me wrong folks, the answers are great examples of elegance in simplicity! I'm just unclear on the achievement for the asker on how division is done efficiently algorithmically if it has to be done step-by-step (a loop was hinted at). –  cfi Oct 24 '12 at 7:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Without the Decimal module (why, though?), assuming Python 3:

def divide(num, den, prec):
    a = (num*10**prec) // den
    s = str(a).zfill(prec+1)
    return s[0:-prec] + "." + s[-prec:]

Thanks to @nneonneo for the clever .zfill() idea!

>>> divide(2,7,1000)
'0.28571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571
42857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142
85714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285
71428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571
42857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142
85714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285
71428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571
42857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142
85714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285
71428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571428571
42857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142
85714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285714285
7142857142857142857142857142857142857142857'

Caveat: This uses floor division, so divide(2,3,2) will give you 0.66 instead of 0.67.

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1  
This works for me in 2.7 –  Eric Oct 23 '12 at 19:22
1  
This looks like a good approach, but decimal placement still needs some work (should get 0.285... not 2.85... for 2/7). –  Andrew Clark Oct 23 '12 at 19:22
3  
I think you should use str(b).zfill(prec+1) to ensure you have enough zeros (e.g. in case someone wants to print 0.001). Then you won't need to use the if at all. –  nneonneo Oct 23 '12 at 19:26
4  
A better approach, too, might be to use ip, fp = divmod(b, 10**prec) to get integral and fractional bits. Then it's just print str(ip) + '.' + str(fp).zfill(prec). –  nneonneo Oct 23 '12 at 19:29
2  
@nneonneo: You should write this as your own answer - that's even more clever and I can't possibly take credit for it :) –  Tim Pietzcker Oct 23 '12 at 19:32

We can use a long to store a decimal with high precision, and do arithmetic on it. Here's how you'd print it out:

def print_decimal(val, prec):
    intp, fracp = divmod(val, 10**prec)
    print str(intp) + '.' + str(fracp).zfill(prec)

Usage:

>>> prec = 1000
>>> a = 2 * 10**prec
>>> b = a//7
>>> print_decimal(b, prec)
0.2857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857
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While the other answers use very large values to handle the precision, this implements long division.

def divide(num, denom, prec=30, return_remainder=False):
    "long divison"
    remain=lim=0
    digits=[]

    #whole part
    for i in str(num):
        d=0;remain*=10

        remain+=int(i)
        while denom*d<=remain:d+=1
        if denom*d>remain:d-=1

        remain-=denom*d
        digits.append(d)

    #fractional part
    if remain:digits.append('.')
    while remain and lim<prec:
        d=0;remain*=10

        while denom*d<=remain:d+=1
        if denom*d>remain:d-=1

        remain-=denom*d
        digits.append(d)
        lim+=1

    #trim leading zeros        
    while digits[0]==0 and digits[1]!='.':
        digits=digits[1:]

    quotient = ''.join(list(map(str,digits)))


    if return_remainder:
        return (quotient, remain)
    else:
        return quotient

Because it's the division algorithm, every digit will be correct and you can get the remainder (unlike floor division which won't have the remainder). The precision here I've implemented as the number of digits after the decimal sign.

>>> divide(2,7,70)
'0.2857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857'
>>> divide(2,7,70,True)
('0.2857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857142857', 1)
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