Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have searched for the answer to this, but cannot seem to find one. Can someone explain why the following code does not give me the 1 of each month, but jumps to the 31 for some months? It is for a report event that needs to determine the next month's date.

DateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MMM-yy"); 
Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance( TimeZone
    .getTimeZone( "America/Los_Angeles" ) );
DateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MMM-yy"); 
Date date;
try
{
  date = (Date)formatter.parse("01-JUN-12");
  cal.setTime(date);
  //cal.set(2012, 05, 01);

  long now = new Date().getTime();
  int frequency = 1;

  System.out.println("Current calendar time=" + cal.getTime().toString()) ;

  while (cal.getTime().getTime() < now)
  {
      cal.add( Calendar.MONTH, frequency );
      System.out.println("In loop - current calendar time=" + cal.getTime().toString()) ;
  }
}
catch (ParseException e)
{
  // TODO Auto-generated catch block
  e.printStackTrace();
} 

The output is:

Current calendar time=Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2012

In loop - current calendar time=Sun Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 2012

In loop - current calendar time=Tue Jul 31 00:00:00 EDT 2012

In loop - current calendar time=Fri Aug 31 00:00:00 EDT 2012

In loop - current calendar time=Mon Oct 01 00:00:00 EDT 2012

In loop - current calendar time=Wed Oct 31 00:00:00 EDT 2012

Notice how it jumps to 31, then back to 1. If I use Calendar.set() instead, the output is correct:

Current calendar time=Fri Jun 01 15:14:26 EDT 2012

In loop - current calendar time=Sun Jul 01 15:14:26 EDT 2012

In loop - current calendar time=Wed Aug 01 15:14:26 EDT 2012

In loop - current calendar time=Sat Sep 01 15:14:26 EDT 2012

In loop - current calendar time=Mon Oct 01 15:14:26 EDT 2012

In loop - current calendar time=Thu Nov 01 15:14:26 EDT 2012

This seems like it is either 1) A bug with the Calendar API, or 2) a lack of understanding of how the Calendar API works. In either case, I just want the next month (same day), unless of course there is a problem with certain months and days. But the above scenario is puzzling me. This does not happen with any other day of the month, only with the 1st.

share|improve this question
1  
change library for date and time on joda time, in this library you don't find any bugs –  BartekM Oct 23 '12 at 19:25
    
Unfortunately I am bound to use the Calendar API, so switching is not an option for this project. –  Joshua Burns Oct 23 '12 at 19:27
1  
Calendar is arguably the most broken class in the JDK: It's virtually unusable. Internally it looks like it was written by a (bad) junior programmer. Use joda time. It's that simple. You should tell who ever is making you use Calendar that they should try working in a field unrelated to programming. –  Bohemian Oct 23 '12 at 19:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's a timezone issue. Replace your existing setup lines with the following, so that the Calendar and the Formatter are both using the same timezone:

    TimeZone tz = TimeZone.getTimeZone("America/Los_Angeles");
    formatter.setTimeZone(tz);
    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance(tz);

and it all works fine:

Current calendar time=Fri Jun 01 08:00:00 BST 2012
In loop - current calendar time=Sun Jul 01 08:00:00 BST 2012
In loop - current calendar time=Wed Aug 01 08:00:00 BST 2012
In loop - current calendar time=Sat Sep 01 08:00:00 BST 2012
In loop - current calendar time=Mon Oct 01 08:00:00 BST 2012
In loop - current calendar time=Thu Nov 01 07:00:00 GMT 2012

You may want to replace the toString() calls with formatter.format() calls so that the output is in the right timezone too (it might look OK to you if you are in EDT, but I'm in the UK timezone, as you can see).

share|improve this answer
    
Great, this worked! Forgot that we acquired this software from a start-up, and they were located in California! –  Joshua Burns Oct 23 '12 at 19:51

Instead of just cal.add( Calendar.MONTH, frequency );, try this:

cal.add(Calendar.MONTH, frequency);
cal.set(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH, cal.getActualMinimum(Calendar.DAY_OF_MONTH));
share|improve this answer
    
That provided more consistent results, however it now shows the 2nd of each month:Current calendar time=Fri Jun 01 00:00:00 EDT 2012 In loop - current calendar time=Sat Jun 02 00:00:00 EDT 2012 In loop - current calendar time=Mon Jul 02 00:00:00 EDT 2012 In loop - current calendar time=Thu Aug 02 00:00:00 EDT 2012 In loop - current calendar time=Sun Sep 02 00:00:00 EDT 2012 In loop - current calendar time=Tue Oct 02 00:00:00 EDT 2012 In loop - current calendar time=Fri Nov 02 00:00:00 EDT 2012 –  Joshua Burns Oct 23 '12 at 19:30
    
At this point, I imagine it'd be something to do with timezones. –  akokskis Oct 23 '12 at 19:37

You are printing the time in the system default time zone. Use formatter to display it.

Set the same time zone for the formatter:

DateFormat formatter = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MMM-yy");
formatter.setTimeZone(TimeZone.getTimeZone("America/Los_Angeles"));

And use it to display the time:

while (cal.getTime().getTime() < now) { 
    cal.add(Calendar.MONTH, frequency);
    System.out.println("In loop - current calendar time=" + formatter.format(cal.getTime()));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I should have realized it was something simple! –  Joshua Burns Oct 23 '12 at 19:51
    
@user1769331: You are welcome. –  Bhesh Gurung Oct 23 '12 at 20:28

From Javadoc Calendar

add(f, delta) adds delta to field f. This is equivalent to calling set(f, get(f) + delta) with two adjustments:

  • Add rule 1. The value of field f after the call minus the value of field f before the call is delta, modulo any overflow that has occurred in field f. Overflow occurs when a field value exceeds its range and, as a result, the next larger field is incremented or decremented and the field value is adjusted back into its range.

  • Add rule 2. If a smaller field is expected to be invariant, but it is impossible for it to be equal to its prior value because of changes in its minimum or maximum after field f is changed or other constraints, such as time zone offset changes, then its value is adjusted to be as close as possible to its expected value. A smaller field represents a smaller unit of time. HOUR is a smaller field than DAY_OF_MONTH. No adjustment is made to smaller fields that are not expected to be invariant. The calendar system determines what fields are expected to be invariant.

In addition, unlike set(), add() forces an immediate recomputation of the calendar's milliseconds and all fields.

Example: Consider a GregorianCalendar originally set to August 31, 1999. Calling add(Calendar.MONTH, 13) sets the calendar to September 30, 2000. Add rule 1 sets the MONTH field to September, since adding 13 months to August gives September of the next year. Since DAY_OF_MONTH cannot be 31 in September in a GregorianCalendar, add rule 2 sets the DAY_OF_MONTH to 30, the closest possible value. Although it is a smaller field, DAY_OF_WEEK is not adjusted by rule 2, since it is expected to change when the month changes in a GregorianCalendar.

So in your case considering the time that you have set if calendar API add month to Jul then it is possible that it is getting overflown more than a month so it is being adjusted back Jul Midnight

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.