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typedef struct DictionaryEntry_s {
    char *key;
    char *value;
} DictionaryEntry;

typedef struct Dictionary_s {
    char *name;
    DictionaryEntry values[0];
} Dictionary;

//How can I do the following:
Dictionary myDictionary[] = { 
    {"synonyms",
        {"good", "cool"},
        {"bad", "evil"},
        {"awesome", "me"},
        {"like", "love"}, //etc....
        {0} //terminator
    },
    {"antonyms",
        {"good", "evil"},
        {"bad", "good"},
        {"awesome", "not me"}, ///...etc
        {0} //terminator
    },
    {0} //terminator
};

As you can see in the code, I want to create a statically allocated but dynamically sized array. I know how to loop through the data, its just that the compiler barfs at the declaration. While I am looking for a C solution, bonus points for C++ in addition.

Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
statically allocated dynamically sized array... How exactly is it possible (even on machine level, taking the language syntax aside) to statically allocate (i.e. pre-allocate during the executable initialization) something, size of which is known at run-time? –  valdo Oct 23 '12 at 19:48
    
@valdo look at the example. the struct has variable size but you can determine the size by looking at the declaration. –  chacham15 Oct 23 '12 at 19:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

C solution requires extra variables for defining internal arrays:

typedef struct DictionaryEntry_s {
    char *key;
    char *value;
} DictionaryEntry;

typedef struct Dictionary_s {
    char *name;
    DictionaryEntry* values;
} Dictionary;

//How can I do the following:
DictionaryEntry myDictionary0[] = {
        {"good", "cool"},
        {"bad", "evil"},
        {"awesome", "me"},
        {"like", "love"}, //etc....
        {0} //terminator
};
Dictionary myDictionary[] = { 
    {"synonyms", myDictionary0},
    // ...
    {0} //terminator
}; // <-- semicolon was missing here

C++ solution - requires std::vector<> - however it is not statically allocated, but dynamically, and it does not requires terminator:

struct DictionaryEntry {
    char *key;
    char *value;
};

struct Dictionary {
    char *name;
    std::vector<DictionaryEntry> values;
};

//How can I do the following:
Dictionary myDictionary[] = { 
    {"synonyms",
      {
        {"good", "cool"},
        {"bad", "evil"},
        {"awesome", "me"},
        {"like", "love"}, //etc....
        {0} //terminator
      } 
    },
    //...
    {0} //terminator
}; // <-- semicolon was missing here   
share|improve this answer
    
the C solution does not work: ` warning: missing braces around initializer for 'DictionaryEntry [0] {aka DictionaryEntry_s [0]}' [-Wmissing-braces] ` and ` error: too many initializers for 'Dictionary '` –  chacham15 Oct 23 '12 at 19:47
    
@chacham15 just missing semicolon after myDisctionary (BTW - mistake copied from your question), See ideone.com/u08AtS –  PiotrNycz Oct 23 '12 at 19:53
    
im sorry, that was my bad, I missed the fact that you changed values to a pointer –  chacham15 Oct 23 '12 at 20:19

In C++11 you can use initializer lists. You can define a DictionaryArray class with a constructor that takes one of these, and then write

DictionaryArray myArray({ /* some list */ });
share|improve this answer
1  
I am pretty sure he doesn't have a compiler for C++11 installed. +1 none-the-less –  Aniket Oct 23 '12 at 20:20

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