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I have the following struct:

struct type1 {
    struct type2 *node;
    union element {
        struct type3 *e;
        int val;
    };
};

When initialising a pointer *f that points to an instance of type1 and doing something like: f.element->e or even just f.element, I get:

error: request for member ‘element’ in something not a structure or union

What am I overseeing here?

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Can you show the declaration of f? Maybe you mean f->element.e? –  cyco130 Oct 23 '12 at 19:36
2  
element is the union tag, not a member name. Try with struct { ... union element { ... } elem; }; and f.elem. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 23 '12 at 19:37
2  
@Darksky Your struct member needs a name to access it. The name is given after the type. struct type1 { ... ; union { ... } element; }; would create a member element with type (untagged) union {...}. –  Daniel Fischer Oct 23 '12 at 19:41
1  
@Darksky: In C 1999 and earlier, adding a name to the end of the union declaration does not just give it a different name than its type. It gives it a name. Without that, it does not have a name; there is no object, no member in the enclosing struct. Without that, it is just a declaration of a type, not of a member. –  Eric Postpischil Oct 23 '12 at 19:58
1  
@DanielFischer: C 2011 introduced anonymous unions and structures, in which case the union does not need a name. –  Eric Postpischil Oct 23 '12 at 19:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

element is the name of the union, not the name of a member of type1. You must give union element a name:

struct type1 {
struct type2 *node;
    union element {
        struct type3 *e;
        int val;
    } x;
};

then you can access it as:

struct type1 *f;
f->x.e
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Maybe you should malloc memory for your f? –  halex Oct 23 '12 at 19:45
    
f must be initialized somehow, yes. –  Olaf Dietsche Oct 23 '12 at 19:47
1  
There may be some issue of C versions here. C 2011 introduced anonymous structures and unions, in which case f->e would work with the original declaration. However, if Darksky is using an earlier version of C, then the union declaration must be modified as shown in this answer. –  Eric Postpischil Oct 23 '12 at 19:50
    
@EricPostpischil Correct, but even then, one wouldn't say: f->element.e –  Olaf Dietsche Oct 23 '12 at 19:51
    
f is already initialised in malloc. This solves it. Thanks. –  Nayefc Oct 23 '12 at 19:57

If f is a pointer, then you may access "element" using f->element, or (*f).element

Update: just saw that "element" is the union name, not a member of the struct. You may try

union element {
    struct type3 *e;
    int val;
} element;

So the final struct would be like this:

struct type1 {
    struct type2 *node;
    union element {
        struct type3 *e;
        int val;
    } element;
};

And now you can access element members like this, through a type1 *f:

struct type1 *f;

// assign f somewhere

f->element.val;
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Read the question please. That's what I did and that's the error I am getting. –  Nayefc Oct 23 '12 at 19:40
1  
@Darksky No. You did f.element and not f->element acording to your question. –  halex Oct 23 '12 at 19:41
    
No I did do both. Quoting: f.element->e or even just f.element, I get. –  Nayefc Oct 23 '12 at 19:57
    
@Darksky f.element->e or f.element is not the same as f->element. f. will always be an error with a pointer *f (but anyway the problem with the union still was there before the edit). Regards –  German Garcia Oct 23 '12 at 21:02

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