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I'm trying to populate the diagonals of an empty matrix (list of lists) in python with the following code:

source=['a','b','c']

rows=[]
for x in source:
    rows.append('')
matrix=[]
for x in source:
    matrix.append(rows)

print "before populating", matrix

for x in range (0, len(source)):
    matrix[x][x]=source[x]

print "after populating", matrix

I realized that this is not the most efficient way to accomplish this, but this actually appears to be the least of my problems.

The output I got was this:

[['a', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'b', 'c']]

But the output I was hoping for was this:

[['a', '', ''], ['', 'b', ''], ['', '', 'c']]

Any idea what went wrong? Many thanks!

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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted
for x in source:
    matrix.append(rows)

You populate matrix with references to rows. You may use slices of rows to make a copy

>> rows = ['a','b','c']
>>> matrix = [rows[:] for _ in range(len(rows))]
>>> matrix
[['a', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'b', 'c'], ['a', 'b', 'c']]
>>> matrix[1][1]=' '
>>> matrix
[['a', 'b', 'c'], ['a', ' ', 'c'], ['a', 'b', 'c']]
share|improve this answer
    
So that's the issue! Thanks! I was so confused! –  Atticus29 Oct 23 '12 at 19:48
    
I know - this may be confusing in Python. Unlike C++, assigning object in Python creates a reference to existing object - not a bitcopy. For simple lists, slice is the approach; for more complicated cases, use module copy –  volcano Oct 23 '12 at 19:51

Others have already explained what's happening with your code, but here's another option...

If you don't mind using numpy then:

import numpy as np
np.diag(['a', 'b', 'c']).tolist()
# [['a', '', ''], ['', 'b', ''], ['', '', 'c']]

And if you're going to be dealing with matrices then it's probably not a bad idea to look at numpy or scipy anyway...

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A simple list comprehension should do it:

In [62]: source=['a','b','c']

In [63]: [[""]*i + [x] + [""]*(len(source)-i-1) for i,x in enumerate(source)]
Out[63]: [['a', '', ''], ['', 'b', ''], ['', '', 'c']]

In [64]: source=['a','b','c','d']

In [65]: [[""]*i + [x] + [""]*(len(source)-i-1) for i,x in enumerate(source)]
Out[65]: [['a', '', '', ''], ['', 'b', '', ''], ['', '', 'c', ''], ['', '', '', 'd']]
share|improve this answer
    
ISWYDT. Thanks! Doesn't tell me what was wrong with mine, but very economical and clear. Thanks! –  Atticus29 Oct 23 '12 at 19:51
source=['a','b','c']

matrix = [['' if i!=j else source[i] for i in range(len(source))]
     for j in range(len(source))]
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You need to create a new row of independen elements for each row in your matrix. Doing matrix.append(rows) only inserts a references to the same list instance again and again.

Try matrix.append(list(rows)) instead.

For more complicated cases the copy module may be helpful.

The root cause for your trouble stems from the fact that Python only handles references to object instance, it does not have a concept of "variable" like in C, so there is no copying of object when you make an assignment. Instead there is just a new reference.

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the problem is withing this code:

rows=[]
for x in source:
    rows.append('')
matrix=[]
for x in source:
    matrix.append(rows)

you are giving the same reference each time.

for x in range (0, len(source)):
    matrix[x][x]=source[x]

this is going to modify the same object. solution: use a copy:

matrix=[]
for x in source:
    # use a copy.
    matrix.append(rows[:])
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