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I have a matrix, whose entries can be -1, 0, or 1. I am trying to use the color to differentiate these different values, since most of them are 0. I use the following code

 x<-y<-seq(1:10)
 xcolor<-c("purple3", "green" , "red")
 image(x,y,DiffMatrix,col=xcolor)

For illustration purposes, the DiffMatrix is a 10*10 matrix,

[1,] 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 -1 0 0

[2,] 1 0 0 0 -1 1 1 1 0 0

[3,] 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

[4,] 1 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

[5,] 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

[6,] 1 0 0 0 -1 1 0 1 0 0

[7,] 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

[8,] 1 0 1 0 0 1 0 0 0 0

[9,] 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

[10,] 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

The generated image is this

enter image description here

My question is, if the matrix becomes very big, like 2000*3000. The resolution of the generated figure using the above approach will be very low. Are there any graphical approaches for showing the distributions of these different values: I want to see how many “1” are occurred in the matrix, and which positions are associated with “1”; which positions are associated with “0”,etc.

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There are a number of things you might try. What about histograms for each colour by row? And then by column? This alone would give you a nice idea of the distribution. –  nograpes Oct 23 '12 at 20:07
1  
Another obvious way: there are only three values. You could do three images of the same matrix side by side, where all but one of the values are white in each image. –  Matthew Plourde Oct 23 '12 at 20:13
    
For large arrays of data, rasterImage will plot a lot faster –  Carl Witthoft Oct 23 '12 at 21:51

1 Answer 1

If you've got relatively high-density, consider plotting points and assigning partially transparent colors to your values. In this way, where there are many "1"s, for example, the points will overlap and darken the image.

The easiest way to assign such colors, once you get used to it :-), is to set the colors in hex: some_color<- #0F66F088, where the first three pairs identify the intensity of RGB, and the last pair identifes the transparency. There are several examples somewhere in the StackOverflow archives, but I forget where :-(

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