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How can I improve the accuracy (precision) of the following?

struct Degree_Minutes { signed int degrees; signed int minutes; double seconds; };
Degree_Minutes geo_dec_to_deg (double dec)
{
    Degree_Minutes degrees_minutes;
    signed int degrees, minutes;
    double remainder, temp, seconds;

    remainder = fmod(dec, 1);
    degrees_minutes.degrees = dec - remainder;
    temp = remainder*60;
    remainder = fmod(temp,1);
    degrees_minutes.minutes = temp-remainder;
    degrees_minutes.seconds = remainder*60;

    return degrees_minutes;
}

    double geo_deg_to_dec (Degree_Minutes degrees)
{
    double decimal = degrees.degrees + (degrees.minutes/60) + (degrees.seconds/60);
    return decimal;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    Degree_Minutes deg;
    double decimal = 38.898556;

    deg = geo_dec_to_deg(decimal);
    cout << "Results of geo_dec_to_deg function: \n" << decimal << " was converted to " << deg.degrees << " degrees, " << deg.minutes << " minutes, " << deg.seconds << " seconds.\n";
    decimal = geo_deg_to_dec(deg);
    cout << "Results of geo_dec_to_deg function: \n" << deg.degrees << " degrees, " << deg.minutes << " minutes, " << deg.seconds << " seconds was converted to " << decimal << "\n";

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

Edit: forgot to add there is a struct here:

struct Degree_Minutes { signed int degrees; signed int minutes; double seconds; };

By the time you convert from decimal to degrees/minutes/seconds and then back to decimal you wind up with 38.9134 when the original was 38.898556.

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Oh, BTW I forgot to note the struct: struct Degree_Minutes { signed int degrees; signed int minutes; double seconds; }; –  Joey Huggins Oct 23 '12 at 20:05
    
Please edit the post to include this new information. –  John Dibling Oct 23 '12 at 20:05
    
It was not necessary to include the declaration of Degree_Minutes as it was deducible from the information provided. (If minutes had been declared as floating point or seconds had been declared as integer, different results would have been obtained.) –  Eric Postpischil Oct 23 '12 at 20:21
    
Probably was not necessary, but I thought it was best for clarity. I know there are a lot of others like myself still trying to improve fledgling skills. –  Joey Huggins Oct 23 '12 at 20:25

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're experiencing roundoff/truncation error due to unintended integer division. To get proper double precision you need to implicitly convert degrees.minutes and degrees.seconds to double, like this:

double decimal = degrees.degrees + (degrees.minutes/60.0) + (degrees.seconds/3600.0);

Note the 60 -> 60.0 and the correction of 60 to 3600 in the seconds field.

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2  
There is a compiler option to warn you of such error, -Wconversion for gcc and clang if I'm not mistaken. -Wall is even better. :-) –  Florian Oct 23 '12 at 20:11
2  
There are 3600 seconds in a degree. –  Hans Passant Oct 23 '12 at 20:19
    
Ah, I see.. as I'm using signed int (not sure why I did signed for the minutes). So, by using a double it should convert it.... Ok, tried this, however, it is now further from the original. Once converted back, it becomes 39.7967 vs. 38.8985 –  Joey Huggins Oct 23 '12 at 20:20
    
Thank you, both. Corrected the 3600 issue and now the conversion process comes back to the original. –  Joey Huggins Oct 23 '12 at 20:22

There are two problems.

First, the minutes member of the Degree_Minutes structure is declared as an integer type, so degrees.minutes/60 divides and integer by an integer, which produces a truncated integer result. Changing this to degrees.minutes/60. yields a floating-point result.

Second, degrees.seconds/60 is incorrect. Either this should be degrees.seconds/3600 or degrees.seconds/60 should be added to degrees.minutes and the sum then divided by 60.

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#include <stdlib.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <math.h>

using namespace std;

struct Degree_Minutes { signed int degrees; signed int minutes; double seconds; };

Degree_Minutes geo_dec_to_deg (double dec)
{
    Degree_Minutes degrees_minutes;
    signed int degrees, minutes;
    double remainder, temp, seconds;

    remainder = fmod(dec, 1);
    degrees_minutes.degrees = dec - remainder;
    temp = remainder*60.0;
    remainder = fmod(temp,1);
    degrees_minutes.minutes = temp-remainder;
    degrees_minutes.seconds = remainder*60.0;

    return degrees_minutes;
}

double geo_deg_to_dec (Degree_Minutes degrees)
{
    double decimal = degrees.degrees + (degrees.minutes/60.0) + (degrees.seconds/60.0/60.0);
    return decimal;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    Degree_Minutes deg;
    double decimal = 38.898556;

    deg = geo_dec_to_deg(decimal);
    cout << "Results of geo_dec_to_deg function: \n" << decimal << " was converted to " << deg.degrees << " degrees, " << deg.minutes << " minutes, " << deg.seconds << " seconds.\n";
    cout << "This should be: 38deg 53' 54.801\"" << endl;
    cout << endl;
    decimal = geo_deg_to_dec(deg);
    cout << "Results of geo_dec_to_deg function: \n" << deg.degrees << " degrees, " << deg.minutes << " minutes, " << deg.seconds << " seconds was converted to " << decimal << "\n";
    cout << "This should be: 38.898556" << endl;

    return EXIT_SUCCESS;
}

You almost had it. You needed to be force double division by explicitly specifying a decimal (as indicated in the other answer) but you also needed to divide the seconds by 60 twice. In practice, I'd probably change this to degrees.seconds/3600, but I left it as is to illustrate.

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