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I have a Debian server and a git repo (Assembla). What I would like to achieve is to have a function which automatically fetches any new revision and puts it in our 'test' host.

Meaning that if I push a new change on the repo, I should see it within a minute on the server running already.

Is that possible?

My server runs Debian 6 Squeeze

UPDATE: I would also like to be able to tell where a folder should be placed (e.g. /src should go into the root folder).

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git pull with cron ? –  ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Oct 23 '12 at 20:19
    
can you be more precise? :D Thanks –  N3sh Oct 23 '12 at 20:21
    
git has post receive hooks which are typically used for that, I would assume assembla has service hooks that allow you to pro-actively tell your server to update, rather than polling for updates. "I would also like to be able to tell where a folder should be placed (e.g. /src should go into the root folder)." <- no idea what that means. –  AD7six Oct 23 '12 at 20:56
    
Yeah, ok. I have a folder in my repo named 'src'. I would like its content to be extracted in a specific location and not into 'src/' –  N3sh Oct 23 '12 at 20:58
    
personally, I'm no clearer with your comment. In any case, edit the question - don't use comments to add information. –  AD7six Oct 23 '12 at 21:00
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Shell script:

#!/bin/bash
dir=$1
cd $dir
git pull
cd -

Cron task:

*/1 * * * * root /usr/bin/bash path_to_script somedir
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*/1 * * * * is the same as * * * * * –  AD7six Oct 23 '12 at 20:47
    
'cd dir' should be 'cd $dir' –  Kartik Mistry Apr 11 at 8:31
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You could always set up a crontab which does an update every few minutes. Something like this:

*/5 * * * * /bin/git pull origin master

I'm sure there are better ways though. But this will run the git command every 5 minutes.

Note: I'm not familiar with the Git CLI syntax, so make sure you write that correctly.

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0,5,10,15,20,25,30,35,40,45,50,55 lol –  ДМИТРИЙ МАЛИКОВ Oct 23 '12 at 20:30
    
What? Can you be more constructive instead? –  N3sh Oct 23 '12 at 20:40
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