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I was wondering if there's any way to make a child more transparent than it's parent. I need to make a div show through more than the div it's contained in, any way to achieve this with CSS?

This is what I'm aiming for: I have a background with 0.6 opacity, the element on the left has 0.8, so it's darker, but I need the one on the right to be more transparent. Setting less alpha to it than the parent doesn't work, it just matches its parent.

enter image description here

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Have you tried this? I've been able to make children more transparent than the parent, but haven't figured out how to make a child more -=opaque=- than the parent - so it seems straightforward enough. Unless there's some bits you're leaving out of your request. (I've done this with DIVs, by the way, but it should be equally possible with just about any block-level element.) –  user1634459 Oct 23 '12 at 20:22
    
I have several elements with different opacities, but the ones on top are more opaque than the entire content background. But now I need to do it the other way around, have a more transparent child than the parent. –  8vius Oct 23 '12 at 20:24

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It can't be done using CSS 2, but can be done using CSS 3 http://www.css3.info/introduction-opacity-rgba/
If you used rgba for backgournd-color for the parent, inside elements will not get opacity.

If you don't want to use css3, you have no way except putting the child outside the parent and play with positions.

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Thanks Amr, I'm already doing this. I have a more transparent background parent element with more opaque children, but now I need the other way around, have a child element more transparent than it's parent, which is its background. –  8vius Oct 23 '12 at 20:25
    
give child less opacity using the "a" of the rgba –  Amr ElGarhy Oct 23 '12 at 20:26
    
That jus makes the child match its parent, I'm updating my question with an image of what I need to achieve. –  8vius Oct 23 '12 at 20:27
    
so this example is not what you want? cssdesk.com/ps5NB –  Amr ElGarhy Oct 23 '12 at 20:36
    
if you look closely, you'll see the child is actually darker than the parent, because of the overlapping transparencies. In the CSS you are setting the child to be more transparent, but it doesn't translate to how it looks. That's what I'm doing at the moment with other elements (the square on the left in my image). –  8vius Oct 23 '12 at 20:51

Depending on what your situation is, you could try any of the following:

  1. Give the child position:absolute and use CSS to move it to the location you want in front of the parent div.
  2. Convert either the child or the parent into an image, then use opacity on the other as necessary.
  3. Use CSS 3: http://www.css3.info/preview/opacity/

Compatibility of the CSS 3 technique in various browsers: http://caniuse.com/css-opacity

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