Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm running windows 7, using python 2.7.3, and I am getting an inheritance error that I can't figure out why. I've done a good bit of searching but haven't found too much related as of yet.

My problem is that I keep getting a AttributeError when I try to inherit from one class to another. The basic structure I have goes something like this:

# pymyClass.py
class myClass(object):
    def __init__(self,aList=None):
        if aList is not None:
            myList = aList
        else:
            myList = ['','','','','']

    def reset(self,aList=None):
        if aList is not None:
            myList = aList
        else:
            myList = ['','','','','']
    #other methods operate without issue


# pymySecondClass.py
import pymyClass
class mySecondClass(pymyClass.myClass):
    def __init__(self,aList=None):
        pymyClass.myClass(aList)


# pymyThirdClass.py
import pymySecondClass
class myThirdClass(pymySecondClass.mySecondClass):
    def __init__(self,aList=None):
        pymySecondClass.mySecondClass(aList)

    def useList(self,aList=None):
        self.reset(aList)
        print self.myList


#pymyObj.py
import pymyThirdClass

myObj = pymyThirdClass.myThirdClass(['a','b','c','1','2'])
myObj.useList()

...but it errors out when I call instantiate the myThirdClass() and call useList(), saying,

AttributeError: 'myThirdClass' object has no attribute 'myList'

I actually compiled my example here, and got the same issue, so I'm thinking inheritance doesn't work the way I'm expecting. I've checked the python documentation, but maybe not close enough? If anyone could help me out here that would be very much appreciated.

I'm thinking I may have to just manually include the field "myList" in the myThirdClass constructor, but that seems incredibly lame. Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
The __init__ override is not done like this. Read about super in python. –  rantanplan Oct 23 '12 at 20:43

2 Answers 2

You never actually attach myList to the instance anywhere. To do that (inside a method), you need to do:

self.myList = ...

rather than just:

myList = ...

where self is the conventional name for the first argument passed to a method.


You've also got some problems with what calling the base classes on your derived classes.

class Foo(object):
   def __init__(self):
      print "I'm a Foo"

class Bar(Foo):
   def __init__(self):
      print "I'm a Bar"
      #This is one way to call a method with the same name on a base class
      Foo.__init__(self)

Some people don't like to do it as Foo.__init__(self) -- Those people use super (which is Ok too as long as you know what you're doing).

share|improve this answer
    
Sweet! Well, that fixes my example here, but my bulkier stuff didn't have the same problem. Still, this gives me new things to triple-check. Thanks! –  LastTigerEyes Oct 23 '12 at 20:51
    
I'd argue that both super and explicit __init__ calling, warrant deep understanding. –  rantanplan Oct 23 '12 at 20:53
    
@rantanplan -- explicit __init__ calling I find to be pretty intuitive. You're calling a function and passing the proper arguments just like you would to any other function. It's that easy ... –  mgilson Oct 23 '12 at 20:54
    
Only in simple cases like these. When you have mixins and multiple inheritance things get more complicated. Still, you gave the correct answer. –  rantanplan Oct 23 '12 at 20:56
    
@rantanplan -- I hold that it doesn't get any more complicated with multiple inheritance. You're still calling a function on an explicit base class. As I'm sure you know, super calls all the functions on all the base classes implicitly (which is why I don't like it). I like to pick and choose what I call :). I don't use mixins, so I can't comment on that situation :) –  mgilson Oct 23 '12 at 20:57

You forgot about the self:

# pymyClass.py
class myClass(object):
    def __init__(self,aList=None):
        if aList is not None:
            self.myList = aList
        else:
            self.myList = ['','','','','']

    def reset(self,aList=None):
        if aList is not None:
            self.myList = aList
        else:
            self.myList = ['','','','','']

without this mylist is "destroyed" after the if clause.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.