Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I am trying to write something that works like the Linux command wc to count words, new lines and bytes in any kind of files and i can only use the C function read. I have written this code and i am getting the correct values for newlines and bytes but i am not getting the correct value for counted words.

int bytes = 0;
int words = 0;
int newLine = 0;
char buffer[1];
int file = open(myfile,O_RDONLY);
if(file == -1){
  printf("can not find :%s\n",myfile);
}
else{
  char last = 'c'; 
  while(read(file,buffer,1)==1){
    bytes++;
    if(buffer[0]==' ' && last!=' ' && last!='\n'){
      words++;
    }
    else if(buffer[0]=='\n'){
      newLine++;
      if(last!=' ' && last!='\n'){
        words++;
      }
    }
    last = buffer[0];
  }        
  printf("%d %d %d %s\n",newLine,words,bytes,myfile);        
} 
share|improve this question
    
What's your output compared to your expected output? – Jordan Kaye Oct 23 '12 at 20:52
    
You need an 'inword' boolean that's yes when you're reading a word and no when you're not; when it changes to being 'in a word', you increment the word count. Define word to suit yourself. – Jonathan Leffler Oct 23 '12 at 20:53
    
you know about regular expressions? if yes then search for libpcre and use it in your program to let it be extensible ... else it worth the time to learn about them – memosdp Oct 23 '12 at 21:00
    
here's how to count words in a string. You could adapt it for your case – J.F. Sebastian Oct 23 '12 at 21:01
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should reverse your logic. Rather than look for a space, and increment your word count, look for a non-space to increment the word count. Also, it can help to use a state variable versus looking at the last char:

int main(void)
{
   const char *myfile = "test.txt";
   int bytes = 0;
   int words = 0;
   int newLine = 0;
   char buffer[1];
   int file = open(myfile,O_RDONLY);
   enum states { WHITESPACE, WORD };
   int state = WHITESPACE;
   if(file == -1){
      printf("can not find :%s\n",myfile);
   }
   else{
      char last = ' '; 
      while (read(file,buffer,1) ==1 )
      {
         bytes++;
         if ( buffer[0]== ' ' || buffer[0] == '\t'  )
         {
            state = WHITESPACE;
         }
         else if (buffer[0]=='\n')
         {
            newLine++;
            state = WHITESPACE;
         }
         else 
         {
            if ( state == WHITESPACE )
            {
               words++;
            }
            state = WORD;
         }
         last = buffer[0];
      }        
      printf("%d %d %d %s\n",newLine,words,bytes,myfile);        
   } 

}

It appears that wc has some logic with respect to punctuation characters not being words, that this code does not handle.

share|improve this answer

use isspace(char ch) function to check whitespaces.

int isInWord = 0;/*false*/
while(read(file,buffer,1)==1){
    bytes++ ;
    if(!isspace(buffer[0])){
         isInWord = 1;/*true*/
         continue;
    }else{
      if(buffer[0] == '\n'){
        newLine++;
      }else{
        if(isInWord)
         words++;
      }
      isInWord = 0;
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
it fails if a file ends on a non-space e.g., "word". Compare to this algorithm – J.F. Sebastian Oct 23 '12 at 21:08
    
Ah i see the bug. Thanks @J.F.Sebastian – Aniket Oct 23 '12 at 21:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.