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I am trying to set an array of base class and derived classes in another class. For example, I have base class:

class Base{
public:
    Base() {};
    Base(float kv) : param(kv) {}
    ~Base() {};
    float getParam() { return param; }
    void setParam(bool kv) { param= kv; }
protected:
    float param;
};

and derived classes like:

class Derived1: public Base{
public:
    Derived1() {};
    Derived1(float kv) : Base(kv) {}
    ~Derived1() {};
};

Now, in another class I have an array of Base type.

class Hive{
public:
    Hive() {};
    Hive(...) : ... {}
    ~Hive() {};
    ...
    float getSomethingFromArray();

    ...
    void setB();
protected:
    ...
    Base *b[7];
};

Now, setB() instantiate array, like:

b[0] = new Derived1();

but when I try to access method of b[0] it would't work. when I call method like:

b[0].setParam(i);

Compiler reports this error

IntelliSense: expression must have class type c:\users\miller\documents\visual studio 2010\projects\hello\hello\objekat.h 139 2 hello

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2  
The derived class is virtual? Or invisible? –  Kerrek SB Oct 23 '12 at 20:54
1  
We can't answer the question because we don't know what method you are trying to access, how you are trying to access it, or what "doesn't work" means. Please reduce your original program to the smallest possible complete program that demonstrates the problem. See SSCCE.ORG for more information. –  Robᵩ Oct 23 '12 at 21:00
2  
The standard container that comes to mind is std::vector<std::unique_ptr<Base>>. –  Kerrek SB Oct 23 '12 at 21:03
    
This program works for me. How does it differ from yours? –  Robᵩ Oct 23 '12 at 21:06
    
You must make the destructor of Base virtual. –  n.m. Oct 23 '12 at 21:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

but when I try to access method of b[0] it would't work. Any ideas why?

b[0] is a Base*. The compiler doesn't know whether the actual type of the object it points to is Base, Derived1 or Derived42, that's why it will only let you call methods from Base on it - because those are the only ones that it can guarantee exist.

I'm guessing you're trying to call methods from Derived1 on it:

b[0] = new Derived1();
//...
b[0]->getSomethingFromArray();

but note that your code could easily be replaced by:

b[0] = new Base();
//...
b[0]->getSomethingFromArray();

what now? To get this to work, you can use casts and cast b[0] to the type you need (provided you're sure of it). If your classes are polymorphic, you can use dynamic_cast, which also does checks to make sure you're casting to the right type (research this).

Or, you could simply take advantage of polymorphism (only if it makes sense in your particular case).

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This is it. Thanks! –  miller Oct 23 '12 at 21:09
    
@Miller sure - also, note stackoverflow.com/questions/13039030/… - it's very important. –  Luchian Grigore Oct 23 '12 at 21:12

Your mistake is very simple, to call method via pointer you must use -> operator - not dot .:

Not this way:

b[0].setParam(i);

But in this way:

b[0]->setParam(i);
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