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I don't know if this this even possible but I have an idea of creating an abstract class to make threads using WinAPI. This class would be inheritaded by class which will define the function to execute in the thread.

I have two classes:

class XYZ{
//...

class ABC: public XYZ{
//...

And i have a construct

ABC::ABC()
{
    addThread(this,1);
}

addThread is defined inside XYZ class:

void addThread(void* self, int a)
{
    DWORD ThreadID;
    THREAD_DATA *threadData;
    threadData->self = self;
    threadData->thread_id = a;
    CreateThread(NULL, 0, createThread, threadData, 0, &ThreadID);
}

As you can see i am creating a structure which contains two fields: object of the superclasses and the number of thread (so the method can know which data use).

This is how the structure looks like:

typedef struct _THREAD_DATA {
void*       self;
int     thread_id;
} THREAD_DATA;

The createThread in an static method of XYZ class:

static DWORD WINAPI createThread(void* _threadData)
{
    THREAD_DATA* threadData = (THREAD_DATA*) _threadData;
    return threadData->self->execute(threadData->thread_id);
}

And here is the place where everything goes wrong. My VSC++ 2010 is underlining the first word "threadDataself" in the second line of the static method body. After compilation I get an error:

left of '->execute' must point to class/struct/union/generic type

I have no idea how to fix it. I wrote this code using those links: http://goo.gl/7VYC3 & http://goo.gl/ETfe7

The execute method is decalared in the XYZ class as:

virtual DWORD execute(int i);

and then defined in the ABC class as

DWORD ABC::execute(int i){
//...

Can anyone please help me? I would appreciate any tips how to make this works.

share|improve this question
    
where are you defining threadDataself? Did you mean threadData->self->execute? –  ryan0 Oct 23 '12 at 21:31
    
Yes, that was a mistake. I edited the question. Sorry for the problem. PS: This is the line with error. –  Elektryk Oct 23 '12 at 21:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

"self" is defined as a void pointer, and you are trying to call the "execute" method on it, which does not exist. you need to change the type of self to the base class that contains the method "execute."

Like this:

typedef struct _THREAD_DATA {
    XYZ*       self;
    int     thread_id;
} THREAD_DATA;

When attempting to call an overridden method polymorphically as you are here, you must make sure the type of the object you are calling the method on is the base class type. You cannot use a void pointer.

share|improve this answer

One obvious error for you to fix:

THREAD_DATA *threadData;
threadData->self = self;
threadData->thread_id = a;

here threadData is a pointer with no value assigned, and then you use is as a valid pointer. You need to change it to

THREAD_DATA *threadData = new THREAD_DATA();

and somehow manage its life time, ie. delete it inside thred function on its end.

share|improve this answer
    
Oh yeah, i totally missed that. I would suggest just taking out the * and passing threadData to CreateThread by reference, but good catch! –  ryan0 Oct 23 '12 at 22:01
    
pointer is important here, if you would remove it then thread function would read thread_data which would not exist actually. Without pointer threadData is created on stack. –  marcinj Oct 23 '12 at 22:03
    
Yep, because it goes out of scope. Ugh, i'm losing it.... –  ryan0 Oct 23 '12 at 22:36
    
Thanks for help. Everything is almost working but I still have one problem. After compiling the project I am getting and error from linker about unresolved identifier XYZ::execute(); As I can ques the compiler is trying to call the method from the base class. But i want to call the method from the superclass. Is this even possible? –  Elektryk Oct 23 '12 at 22:42
    
replace virtual DWORD execute(int i); in XYZ with virtual DWORD execute(int i) = 0; or with virtual DWORD execute(int i){return 0;}. –  marcinj Oct 23 '12 at 22:43

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