Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I currently have a class called TextureObject. In the creation function I create the texture, and assign a LPCSTR in the class to a parameter given in the function. When I return that LPCSTR later, it returns in an unexpected manner.

Some type names and functions are from DirectX 11, just ignore them.

Code:

The h File:

class TextureObject
{
public:
    ID3D11ShaderResourceView *pTexture;
    LPCSTR GetFilename() const { return *FFilename; }

    bool IsNotNull;
    void CreateTexture(ID3D11Device &dev,LPCSTR Filename);
    void ReCreate(ID3D11Device &dev);
    void Release();
    int relativeId;
private:
    LPCSTR *FFilename;
};

The cpp file:

void TextureObject::CreateTexture(ID3D11Device &dev,LPCSTR Filename)
{
    D3DX11CreateShaderResourceViewFromFile(
            &dev,        // the Direct3D device
            Filename,    // load Wood.png in the local folder
            NULL,        // no additional information
            NULL,        // no multithreading
            &pTexture,   // address of the shader-resource-view
            NULL);       // no multithreading
    FFilename = new LPCSTR(Filename);
    IsNotNull = true;
}

void TextureObject::ReCreate(ID3D11Device &dev)
{
    CreateTexture(dev, *FFilename);
}

When using vs 2012 debugger in the CreateTexture function, the Filename debugger values are:

0x0a06fed0 "C:\Users\Utilizador\Desktop\particle.png"

Which is perfect for me! When i assign the class's FFilename:

FFilename = new LPCSTR(Filename);

It's ok. When I check the value of FFilename within the scope of this function, it's the same value of the Filename. But when i use GetFilename, things start getting crazy:

 = 0x0a06fed0 "îþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþîþü =I.C"

Mmm, I just met you, and this is crazy, but... Here's my value. mKay?

Well, please help me. Thank You

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are not copying the string. You are copying the pointer. I think you probably wanted to copy the string, because you cannot guarantee the caller's pointer will still reference valid data at a later time.

LPCSTR is just a const char*. There's probably a corresponding windows call, but I would just use strdup to copy the string.

Define FFilename as LPCSTR:

LPCSTR FFilename;

And then:

void TextureObject::CreateTexture(ID3D11Device &dev,LPCSTR Filename)
{
    D3DX11CreateShaderResourceViewFromFile(
            &dev,        // the Direct3D device
            Filename,    // load Wood.png in the local folder
            NULL,        // no additional information
            NULL,        // no multithreading
            &pTexture,   // address of the shader-resource-view
            NULL);       // no multithreading
    FFilename = strdup(Filename);
    IsNotNull = true;
}

void TextureObject::ReCreate(ID3D11Device &dev)
{
    CreateTexture(dev, FFilename);
}

Since you are using C++, you are free to use std::string instead, which will be cleaned up automatically when the object is destroyed.

share|improve this answer
    
So what i did wrong(Looking away from the pointer declaration) was the duplication. Thank you sir, and also the others... –  Miguel P Oct 23 '12 at 21:57
    
Yes, the problem is you duplicated a pointer to a string instead of the string itself. If you use this method (instead of C++ strings) make sure you initialize FFilename to NULL in your constructor and free it in your destructor. –  paddy Oct 23 '12 at 22:00
    
Downvoted! Perhaps the voter wishes to comment on what is wrong with this answer. –  paddy Oct 23 '12 at 22:23
    
I didn't downvote, but see this question about strdup. –  Jesse Good Oct 23 '12 at 23:07
    
@JesseGood Ahh okay... That would be splitting hairs I believe, considering LPCSTR and Direct3D are also not defined in the C standard. –  paddy Oct 23 '12 at 23:33

When you create your pointer FFilename, you're initializing it with another pointer. That's not going to make a copy of the string, now you have two pointers pointing to the same thing. Presumably that thing is a temporary object, and when you go to look at it later it's no longer valid.

I'd suggest using std::string for this instead, it's much less error prone. The c_str method can get a LPCSTR at any time.

share|improve this answer

As marcin_j said, use std::[w]string. As for the line:

FFilename = new LPCSTR(Filename);

It just allocates 4 bytes for a pointer and initializes it to the filename string. It doesn't actually copy the string. So you can still use the string, but it is owned by whoever calls TextureObject::CreateTexture, and may be released while TextureObject is still referencing it.

Change the class to:

class TextureObject      
{      
public:      
    // ...all the same stuff as before...

private:      
    wstring FFilename;  // it's better to store filenames as Unicode
};

And the methods to:

void TextureObject::CreateTexture(ID3D11Device* dev, const wstring& Filename)        
{        
    D3DX11CreateShaderResourceViewFromFile(        
            dev,        // the Direct3D device        
            Filename.c_str(),    // load Wood.png in the local folder        
            NULL,        // no additional information        
            NULL,        // no multithreading        
            &pTexture,   // address of the shader-resource-view        
            NULL);       // no multithreading        

    FFilename = Filename;
    IsNotNull = true;        
}        

void TextureObject::ReCreate(ID3D11Device* dev)        
{        
    CreateTexture(dev, FFilename.c_str());        
}        
share|improve this answer

Instead of using all of this low level pointers :

LPCSTR Filename

LPCSTR *FFilename;

just use std::string or std::wstring

what does:

FFilename = new LPCSTR(Filename);

actually do?, LPCSTR stands for const char*

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.