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I'm learning how the IP addressing works, by reading the book Computer Networking from Kurose. Trying to solve some of the problems, i realize that perhaps i didnt understand that quite well...

The problem is the following:

Consider a router that interconnects three subnets: Subnet 1, Subnet 2, and Subnet 3. Suppose all of the interfaces in each of these three subnets are required to have the prefix 223.1.17/24. Also suppose that Subnet 1 is required to support up to 63 interfaces, Subnet 2 is to support up to 95 interfaces, and Subnet 3 is to support up to 16 interfaces. Provide three network addresses (of the form a.b.c.d/x) that satisfy these constraints.

I would provide the following addresses for the first two subnets:

223.1.17.0/26
223.1.17.64/25

But then I checked the solutions and the answer is this:

223.1.17.0/26
223.1.17.128/25

What is wrong with my answer?

I also have another question:

When there are some fixed number of interfaces supported for each subnet, the subnet address (223.1.17.0) dont count right? (the same with the broadcast address 255.255.255.255?) I think im not fully understanding this..

Thank you.

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1 Answer 1

"Consider a router that interconnects three subnets: Subnet 1, Subnet 2, and Subnet 3. Suppose all of the interfaces in each of these three subnets are required to have the prefix 223.1.17/24. Also suppose that Subnet 1 is required to support up to 63 interfaces, Subnet 2 is to support up to 95 interfaces, and Subnet 3 is to support up to 16 interfaces. Provide three network addresses (of the form a.b.c.d/x) that satisfy these constraints." I would provide the following addresses for the first two subnets: 223.1.17.0/26 223.1.17.64/25

Your answer 223.1.17.0/26 223.1.17.64/25 is technically correct if S1 needed less than 63 hosts. I presume the books answer is a typo and needed to be 223.1.17.0/25 223.1.17.128/25. Your answer contains two errors:

  • /25 provides 126 possible hosts and starts .0 - .128
  • you want 63 and 95 hosts and a /26 (being .0 - .64) only provides 62 valid hosts
  • the books answer doesn't seem right because /26 only has 62 valid hosts and you want 63 -> /25 would need to be used

You should calculate using (2^n-2) for the amount of usable hosts and 2^n for the block.

So this said you would have this:

223.1.17.0/24, 3 subnets (S1 63 hosts, S2 95 hosts, S3 16 hosts)

S1: 223.1.17.0 - 223.1.17.127 (MASK: 255.255.255.128) 223.1.17.0/25
S2: 223.1.17.128 - 223.1.17.225 (MASK: 255.255.255.128) 223.1.17.128/25
S3: 223.1.18.0 - 223.1.18.31 (MASK: 225.255.255.224) 223.1.18.0/27

"I have another question: when there are some fixed number of interfaces supported for each subnet, the subnet address (223.1.17.0) dont count right? (the same with the broadcast address 255.255.255.255?) I think im not fully understanding this.."

223.1.17.0/24 is the subnet you can use to start subnetting. So for S1 223.1.17.0 would be the network address and 223.1.17.127 is the broadcast address and 223.1.17.1-126 are the host addresses.

Also check out both links:

Extra

For the slighest chance you made a typo with the amount of hosts for S1 (62 and not 63) then you can perfectly fit all the subnets in the 223.1.17.0/24 range. (technically you would always leave room for growth, so in a live environment I wouldn't reccomend this).

223.1.17.0/24, 3 subnets (S1 62 hosts, S2 95 hosts, S3 16 hosts)

S1: 223.1.17.128 - 223.1.17.192 (MASK: 255.255.255.192) 223.1.17.128/26
S2: 223.1.17.0 - 223.1.17.127 (MASK: 255.255.255.128) 223.1.17.0/25
S3: 223.1.17.192 - 223.1.17.223 (MASK: 225.255.255.224) 223.1.17.192/27
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From original question "three subnets are required to have the prefix 223.1.17/24", your S3: 223.1.18.0/27, is it still valid? –  user1500049 Oct 24 '12 at 16:05
    
It's impossible? Lucia wants a subnet for 63 hosts and 95 hosts (two subnets of 126 usable hosts) so you use 0-127 and 128-255 so tell me where you can fit in another subnet that holds 16 hosts? ;) –  t.thielemans Oct 24 '12 at 21:17
    
Unless she made a typo and needs 62 hosts and not 63, in that case you would be able to fit them all in the 223.1.17.0/24 range. But to be on the safe side you wouldn't use a subnet that provides just enough addresses, you always leave some room for growth. –  t.thielemans Oct 24 '12 at 21:23
    
It's probably a mistake by the authors of the book. It's common to forget that there are both reserved "network" and "broadcast" addresses (though it is possible to define them both to be the same "zero" address, I've never seen this in practice). –  Brian White Oct 25 '12 at 13:47
2  
@t.thielemans, 223.1.17.64 becomes 11011111 00000001 00010001 010000000. Note that the very last "1" is in bit position #25 (from the left) but a /25 subnet is only bits 0-24 (25 bits inclusive). Starting with address #65, the 95th address would be #159 or 10011111. Note that the highest "1" is in bit #7 (from the right) but you have only bits 0-6 for the on-subnet-address. In practice, the OS will not give an error but simply accept only the left-most 25 bits meaning your subnet address is actually 223.1.17.0/25 despite having specified 223.1.17.64/25. Operations are always bitwise. –  Brian White Oct 25 '12 at 15:02

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