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Hi there I have this "confirmable" button directive which I am working on,

The html code that will trigger the directive 'confirmable'

      <span confirmable ng-click='users.splice($index,1)'></span>

the directive: (coffeescript)

  angular.module('buttons',[])

  .directive 'confirmable', () ->
    template: """
      <button class='btn btn-mini btn-danger'>
        Destroy
      </button>
    """
    replace: yes

So the end result I'd like to see generated with this directive is

      <button class='btn btn-mini btn-danger' ng-click='users.splice($index,1)'>
        Destroy
      </button>

So far I got it to work with a linking function inside the directive

  angular.module('buttons',[])

  .directive 'confirmable', () ->
    template: """
      <button class='btn btn-mini btn-danger'>
        Destroy
      </button>
    """
    replace: yes
    link: (scope, el, attrs) ->               <---------- linking function
      $(el).attr 'ng-click', attrs.ngClick

But I've gone through the directive documentation again, and found the scope property with the =, @, & operators but I am really unsure if they are what I need. Then there's this transclude properties which I still need to understand but at the moment doesn't seem to be helpful either. So while my linking function does the trick for now, but I thought I should ask to see if angular provides a more elegant solution.

Thanks!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It sounds to me like you want to call a method from a parent scope from within your directive...

I've put together a Plunk here

(Sorry, I like JavaScript... so here goes)

Here's you're parent controller.

app.controller('ParentCtrl', function($scope) {
    $scope.fooCalled = 0;
    $scope.foo = function() {
        $scope.fooCalled++;
    };
});

Then your mark up

<div ng-controller="ParentCtrl">
   Foo Called: {{fooCalled}}<br/>
   <button ng-click="foo()">Call From Parent</button><br/>
   <custom-control custom-click="foo()"></custom-control>
</div>

And your directive declaration:

app.directive('customControl', function(){
   return {
     restrict: 'E',
     scope: {
        innerFoo: '&customClick'
     },
     template: '<button ng-click="innerFoo()">Call From Control</button>'
   };
});

The bit in the scope declaration in your directive definition is what ties the parent scope function reference to your directive's scope so it can be called on click. That's what the & is for there.

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1  
I can see that's quite useful, being to pass functions around like this. Just curious, though, can you pass arguments to foo(), then? and how will it get trickled down to the directive? –  Nik Oct 23 '12 at 22:15
    
Yes, you can pass arguments. Things generally "trickle-down" from directive to parent, not the other way around. If you required something be done on the directive before calling the reference to the parent's function, then you'd simply wrap that call in another scope function in the directive's controller declaration. –  Ben Lesh Oct 23 '12 at 22:18
1  
Hmm. Is it not recommended to re-use ng-click since it's so commonly known? It works in your example, but if you use the replace: true option for your directive, it breaks. I have no idea why. =[ –  Langdon Mar 24 '13 at 21:34
    
Adding replace: true doesn't break it.. see here. Perhaps something else has happened? –  Ben Lesh Mar 25 '13 at 0:38

You're doing it right. Controllers are for sharing common functionality among directives; you don't need one here. Also this case is so simple you don't even need a link function:

http://jsfiddle.net/V7Kpb/12/

Copying the directive attributes over in the link stage doesn't do anything as far as Angular is concerned. You'll just have a button with an ng-click attribute but that was added after Angular processed the DOM.

Also note, element as the second parameter to the link function already is jQLite (and presumably full jQuery if you have that linked in too.) No need to jQuerify it.

Also, regarding isolate scopes (the =, @ and & you mention). It's a lovely elegant syntax but the big downside is any other directives on the same element get isolated from scope too. So if you want to work with ngModel which is a common thing to do you can't use an isolate scope. Actually even in this case, if you use an isolate scope ng-click stop working. Because it will try to evaluate the expression which contains things not explicitly declared in the scope{} property.

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