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Is there any way to check whether a file is locked without using a try/catch block?

Right now, the only way I know of is to just open the file and catch any System.IO.IOException.

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5  
The trouble is that an IOException could be thrown for many reasons other than a locked file. –  JohnFx Feb 9 '10 at 16:48
2  
This is an old question, and all of the old answers are incomplete or wrong. I added a complete and correct answer. –  Eric J. Dec 23 '13 at 18:27

11 Answers 11

up vote 90 down vote accepted

No, unfortunately, and if you think about it, that information would be worthless anyway since the file could become locked the very next second (read: short timespan).

Why specifically do you need to know if the file is locked anyway? Knowing that might give us some other way of giving you good advice.

If your code would look like this:

if not locked then
    open and update file

Then between the two lines, another process could easily lock the file, giving you the same problem you were trying to avoid to begin with: exceptions.

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9  
If file is locked, we can wait some time and try again. If it is another kind of issue with file access then we should just propagate exception. –  DixonD Oct 8 '10 at 5:11
8  
Yes, but the standalone check for whether a file is locked is useless, the only correct way to do this is to try to open the file for the purpose you need the file, and then handle the lock problem at that point. And then, as you say, wait, or deal with it in another way. –  Lasse V. Karlsen Oct 8 '10 at 8:06
2  
You could argue the same for access rights though it would of course be more unlikely. –  user232986 Jun 6 '13 at 9:38
5  
@LasseV.Karlsen Another benefit of doing a preemptive check is that you can notify the user before attempting a possible long operation and interrupting mid-way. The lock occurring mid-way is still possible of course and needs to be handled, but in many scenarios this would help the user experience considerably. –  Thiru Jun 19 '13 at 18:01
    
I think the best to do is a File.ReadWaitForUnlock(file, timeout) method. and returns null or the FileStream depending on success. I'm following the logic right here? –  Bart Dec 13 '13 at 20:50

When I faced with a similar problem, I finished with the following code:

public bool IsFileLocked(string filePath)
{
    try
    {
        using (File.Open(filePath, FileMode.Open)){}
    }
    catch (IOException e)
    {
        var errorCode = Marshal.GetHRForException(e) & ((1 << 16) - 1);

        return errorCode == 32 || errorCode == 33;
    }

    return false;
}
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9  
+1 Just what i needed for my issue :-) –  Fedearne Oct 28 '10 at 7:20
    
Oh, it seems that I haven't read that question has part "...without using a try catch block"( –  DixonD Dec 15 '10 at 15:45
2  
Thanks for the code! it helps me :D –  cyrene Jun 16 '11 at 9:40
    
too bad opening sqlite db used by firefox will leave program hang waiting for just the exception to be thrown –  kite Sep 12 '13 at 6:18
    
@kite: There is a better way now stackoverflow.com/a/20623302/141172 –  Eric J. Jan 22 at 22:48

The other answers rely on old information. This one provides a better solution.

Long ago it was impossible to reliably get the list of processes locking a file because Windows simply did not track that information. To support the Restart Manager API, that information is now tracked.

I put together code that takes the path of a file and returns a List<Process> of all processes that are locking that file.

static public class FileUtil
{
    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential)]
    struct RM_UNIQUE_PROCESS
    {
        public int dwProcessId;
        public System.Runtime.InteropServices.ComTypes.FILETIME ProcessStartTime;
    }

    const int RmRebootReasonNone = 0;
    const int CCH_RM_MAX_APP_NAME = 255;
    const int CCH_RM_MAX_SVC_NAME = 63;

    enum RM_APP_TYPE
    {
        RmUnknownApp = 0,
        RmMainWindow = 1,
        RmOtherWindow = 2,
        RmService = 3,
        RmExplorer = 4,
        RmConsole = 5,
        RmCritical = 1000
    }

    [StructLayout(LayoutKind.Sequential, CharSet = CharSet.Unicode)]
    struct RM_PROCESS_INFO
    {
        public RM_UNIQUE_PROCESS Process;

        [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = CCH_RM_MAX_APP_NAME + 1)]
        public string strAppName;

        [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.ByValTStr, SizeConst = CCH_RM_MAX_SVC_NAME + 1)]
        public string strServiceShortName;

        public RM_APP_TYPE ApplicationType;
        public uint AppStatus;
        public uint TSSessionId;
        [MarshalAs(UnmanagedType.Bool)]
        public bool bRestartable;
    }

    [DllImport("rstrtmgr.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Unicode)]
    static extern int RmRegisterResources(uint pSessionHandle,
                                          UInt32 nFiles,
                                          string[] rgsFilenames,
                                          UInt32 nApplications,
                                          [In] RM_UNIQUE_PROCESS[] rgApplications,
                                          UInt32 nServices,
                                          string[] rgsServiceNames);

    [DllImport("rstrtmgr.dll", CharSet = CharSet.Auto)]
    static extern int RmStartSession(out uint pSessionHandle, int dwSessionFlags, string strSessionKey);

    [DllImport("rstrtmgr.dll")]
    static extern int RmEndSession(uint pSessionHandle);

    [DllImport("rstrtmgr.dll")]
    static extern int RmGetList(uint dwSessionHandle,
                                out uint pnProcInfoNeeded,
                                ref uint pnProcInfo,
                                [In, Out] RM_PROCESS_INFO[] rgAffectedApps,
                                ref uint lpdwRebootReasons);

    /// <summary>
    /// Find out what process(es) have a lock on the specified file.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="path">Path of the file.</param>
    /// <returns>Processes locking the file</returns>
    /// <remarks>See also:
    /// http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa373661(v=vs.85).aspx
    /// http://wyupdate.googlecode.com/svn-history/r401/trunk/frmFilesInUse.cs (no copyright in code at time of viewing)
    /// 
    /// </remarks>
    static public List<Process> WhoIsLocking(string path)
    {
        uint handle;
        string key = Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
        List<Process> processes = new List<Process>();

        int res = RmStartSession(out handle, 0, key);
        if (res != 0) throw new Exception("Could not begin restart session.  Unable to determine file locker.");

        try
        {
            const int ERROR_MORE_DATA = 234;
            uint pnProcInfoNeeded = 0,
                 pnProcInfo = 0,
                 lpdwRebootReasons = RmRebootReasonNone;

            string[] resources = new string[] { path }; // Just checking on one resource.

            res = RmRegisterResources(handle, (uint)resources.Length, resources, 0, null, 0, null);

            if (res != 0) throw new Exception("Could not register resource.");                                    

            //Note: there's a race condition here -- the first call to RmGetList() returns
            //      the total number of process. However, when we call RmGetList() again to get
            //      the actual processes this number may have increased.
            res = RmGetList(handle, out pnProcInfoNeeded, ref pnProcInfo, null, ref lpdwRebootReasons);

            if (res == ERROR_MORE_DATA)
            {
                // Create an array to store the process results
                RM_PROCESS_INFO[] processInfo = new RM_PROCESS_INFO[pnProcInfoNeeded];
                pnProcInfo = pnProcInfoNeeded;

                // Get the list
                res = RmGetList(handle, out pnProcInfoNeeded, ref pnProcInfo, processInfo, ref lpdwRebootReasons);
                if (res == 0)
                {
                    processes = new List<Process>((int)pnProcInfo);

                    // Enumerate all of the results and add them to the 
                    // list to be returned
                    for (int i = 0; i < pnProcInfo; i++)
                    {
                        try
                        {
                            processes.Add(Process.GetProcessById(processInfo[i].Process.dwProcessId));
                        }
                        // catch the error -- in case the process is no longer running
                        catch (ArgumentException) { }
                    }
                }
                else throw new Exception("Could not list processes locking resource.");                    
            }
            else if (res != 0) throw new Exception("Could not list processes locking resource. Failed to get size of result.");                    
        }
        finally
        {
            RmEndSession(handle);
        }

        return processes;
    }
}
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4  
The only answer here that actually answers the OP question... nice! –  Serj Sagan Dec 23 '13 at 15:14

You can also check if any process is using this file and show a list of programs you must close to continue like an installer does.

public static string GetFileProcessName(string filePath)
    {

            Process[] procs = Process.GetProcesses();
            string fileName = Path.GetFileName(filePath);

            foreach (Process proc in procs)
            {
                if (proc.MainWindowHandle != new IntPtr(0) && !proc.HasExited)
                {
                    ProcessModule[] arr = new ProcessModule[proc.Modules.Count];
                    foreach (ProcessModule pm in proc.Modules)
                    {
                        if (pm.ModuleName == fileName)
                            return proc.ProcessName;
                    }
                }
            }


        return null;
    }
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6  
This can only tell which process keeps an executable module (dll) locked. It will not tell you which process has locked, say, your xml file. –  Constantin Jul 8 '12 at 20:58

Instead of using interop you can use the .NET FileStream class methods Lock and Unlock:

FileStream.Lock http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.filestream.lock.aspx

FileStream.Unlock http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.io.filestream.unlock.aspx

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1  
This is really the correct answer, as it gives the user the ability to not just lock/unlock files but sections of the files as well. All of the "You can't do that without transactions" comments may raise a valid concern, but are not useful since they're pretending that the functionality isn't there or is somehow hidden when it's not. –  BrainSlugs83 Oct 13 '11 at 21:49
19  
Actually, this is not a solution because you cannot create an instance of FileStream if the file is locked. (an exception will be thrown) –  Zé Carlos Jan 27 '12 at 17:54

You could call LockFile via interop on the region of file you are interested in. This will not throw an exception, if it succeeds you will have a lock on that portion of the file (which is held by your process), that lock will be held until you call UnlockFile or your process dies.

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Then between the two lines, another process could easily lock the file, giving you the same problem you were trying to avoid to begin with: exceptions.

However, this way, you would know that the problem is temporary, and to retry later. (E.g., you could write a thread that, if encountering a lock while trying to write, keeps retrying until the lock is gone.)

The IOException, on the other hand, is not by itself specific enough that locking is the cause of the IO failure. There could be reasons that aren't temporary.

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A variation of DixonD's excellent answer (above).

    public static bool TryOpen(
        string path,
        FileMode fileMode,
        FileAccess fileAccess,
        FileShare fileShare,
        TimeSpan timeout,
        out Stream stream)
    {
        var endTime = DateTime.Now + timeout;
        while (DateTime.Now < endTime)
        {
            if (TryOpen(path, fileMode, fileAccess, fileShare, out stream))
                return true;
        }

        stream = null;
        return false;
    }

    public static bool TryOpen(
        string path,
        FileMode fileMode,
        FileAccess fileAccess,
        FileShare fileShare,
        out Stream stream)
    {
        try
        {
            stream = File.Open(path, fileMode, fileAccess, fileShare);
            return true;
        }
        catch (IOException e)
        {
            if (!FileIsLocked(e))
                throw;

            stream = null;
            return false;
        }
    }

    private const uint HRFileLocked = 0x80070020;
    private const uint HRPortionOfFileLocked = 0x80070021;
    private static bool FileIsLocked(IOException ioException)
    {
        var errorCode = (uint)Marshal.GetHRForException(ioException);
        return errorCode == HRFileLocked || errorCode == HRPortionOfFileLocked;
    }

Usage:

    private void Sample(string filePath)
    {
        Stream stream = null;

        try
        {
            var timeOut = TimeSpan.FromSeconds(1);

            if (!TryOpen(
                filePath,
                FileMode.Open,
                FileAccess.ReadWrite,
                FileShare.ReadWrite,
                timeOut,
                out stream))
                return;

            // Use stream...
        }
        finally
        {
            if (stream != null)
                stream.Close();
        }
    }
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This is the only practical solution so far. And it works. –  Contango Feb 5 '13 at 19:28
1  
Boooyyyyy... You better put some Thread.Sleep(200) in there and get off my CPU! –  Paul Knopf Apr 16 at 15:27
    
What part do you want to sleep? Why? –  Tristan Apr 17 at 21:39
    
@Tristan I guess, Paul Knopf meant to use Thread.Sleep between access tries. –  DixonD Aug 22 at 5:42

You can see if the file is locked by trying to read or lock it yourself first.

Please see my answer here for more information.

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Here's a variation of DixonD's code that adds number of seconds to wait for file to unlock, and try again:

 public bool IsFileLocked(string filePath, int secondsToWait)
    {
        bool isLocked = true;
        int i = 0;
        while (isLocked &&  ((i < secondsToWait) || (secondsToWait == 0)))
        {
            try
            {
                using (File.Open(filePath, FileMode.Open)) { }
                return false;
            }
            catch (IOException e)
            {
                var errorCode = Marshal.GetHRForException(e) & ((1 << 16) - 1);
                isLocked = errorCode == 32 || errorCode == 33;
                i++;
                if (secondsToWait !=0)
                    new System.Threading.ManualResetEvent(false).WaitOne(1000);
            }
        }
        return isLocked;
    }


if (!IsFileLocked(file, 10))
{
   ...
}
else
{
   throw new Exception(...);
}
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1  
Well, I was doing a kind of the same thing in my original answer till somebody decided to simplify it:) stackoverflow.com/posts/3202085/revisions –  DixonD Jan 10 at 11:25

What I ended up doing is:

internal void LoadExternalData() {
    FileStream file;
    if (TryOpenRead("filepath/filename", 5, out file)) {
        using (file)
        using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(file)) {
         // do something 
        }
    }
}


internal bool TryOpenRead(string path, int timeout, out FileStream file) {
    bool isLocked = true;
    bool condition = true;
    do {
        try {
            file = File.OpenRead(path);
            return true;
        } catch (IOException e) {
            var errorCode = Marshal.GetHRForException(e) & ((1 << 16) - 1);
            isLocked = errorCode == 32 || errorCode == 33;
            condition = (isLocked && timeout > 0);
            if (condition) {
                // we only wait if the file is locked. If the exception is of any other type, there's no point on keep trying. just return false and null;
                timeout--;
                new System.Threading.ManualResetEvent(false).WaitOne(1000);
            }
        }
    } while (condition);
    file = null;
    return false;
}
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1  
You should consider a Using block for file –  VoteCoffee Apr 28 at 19:04
1  
Use System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(1000) instead of new System.Threading.ManualResetEvent(false).WaitOne(1000) –  Endrju Aug 12 at 11:41

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