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I am responsible for building multiple RPMs. I have pristine SPEC files for each RPM package that I need to make, and I have BASH scripts which set up the necessary environment and build the RPMs.

I would like to use an actual build tool, such as make, to build these RPMs. By doing so, I hope to eliminate the need for custom, obfuscating BASH scripts in favor of clear, maintainable configuration files (analogous to make's Makefile). However, using POSIX make and keeping sets of make files up to date is probably as much work as maintaining the BASH scripts I currently use to build the RPM packages. There is a reason for programs like cmake and automake which wrap the capabilities of the make command - These tools are much more expressive, allowing for smaller, cleaner configuration files.

However, using autoconf/automake seems a poor choice as well, as they seem to be specifically built for C and C++ development. It has also been suggested that I use scons, but although this seems the best choice (due to its configuration files being actual python scripts), it too is geared for specific languages.

Using my SPEC files as "source code" and the environment as "dependencies" (such as setting up rpmbuild's directory tree structure needed to make RPMs), is there a good build tool I can use to replace my BASH scripts for a cleaner, more maintainable RPM building solution?

EDIT: It appears I was unclear about what I need when I say "build tool". I already use rpmbuild as the 'compiler' I use to 'compile' RPMs using the SPEC file (and relevant source code for the binaries) as 'source code'. I am asking for a tool which can coordinate that process.

share|improve this question
4  
what's wrong with rpmbuild linux.die.net/man/8/rpmbuild? – Serge Oct 23 '12 at 22:21
    
All the tools you mention are responsible for creating the "final" distribution files. This is done in the way the source author has intended to. What you are looking for lives one level higher resp. one step later. – glglgl Oct 24 '12 at 6:14
    
As stated in a comment below, you can't make RPM's without rpmbuild. I already use that tool. I have lots of RPMs to build, however, and so I view rpmbuild, not as the build tool (like make), but rather as the 'compiler' and the SPEC files as the 'source code'. These RPMs together compose a suite, which is the product that the build tool would produce. – djhaskin987 Oct 24 '12 at 15:32
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Depending on the complexity of what you need to do, SCons could indeed be a good choice. I always find it much easier to script in Python than Bash. But that's also a personal preference.

Here's the pertinent Python/SCons code to generate an RPM in SCons:

env = Environment(tools=['default', 'packaging'])

rpmSourceFiles = ['file1', 'file2'] # This is a Python list
rpmTargetFile = 'yourRpmFile'

env.Package( source         = rpmSourceFiles,
             target         = rpmTargetFile,
             NAME           = 'foo',
             VERSION        = '1.2.3',
             PACKAGEVERSION = 0,
             PACKAGETYPE    = 'rpm',
             LICENSE        = 'gpl',
             SUMMARY        = 'balalalalal',
             DESCRIPTION    = 'this should be really really long',
             X_RPM_GROUP    = 'Application/fu',
             SOURCE_URL     = 'http://foo.org/foo-1.2.3.tar.gz'
        )

You can find the Package() builder documented here. Regarding the rpmSourceFiles, its a Python list and should list the RPM input files. If you used SCons to install these source files, then you can just list there simple names, otherwise you will need to provide absolute paths.

Another option if you just want to use only Python, would be to program RPM directly with Python, as explained here.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for pointing out functionality in scons that may be relevant to my case. I'll look into it. – djhaskin987 Oct 24 '12 at 15:29
2  
CMake with CPack can target RPMs too. – Steve-o Oct 25 '12 at 15:29
    
@Steve-o, Im sure it can, but first you'd have to learn the un-intuitive CMake syntax, then create the makefile (which is very huge and unreadable), then actually do the make. No thanks, I'll stick with SCons, its Python, and Python is awesome! :) – Brady Oct 25 '12 at 16:44
    
Thanks for your links to relevant reference guides and your sample code. It appears this is what I should do. – djhaskin987 Oct 26 '12 at 20:33
1  
@Brady, with CMake you don't need to create Makefile yourself, only CMakeLists.txt is required. – Ding-Yi Chen Jul 4 '14 at 5:04

As mentioned by @Serge, rpmbuild is the tool you want to use. It comes with rpm package (or subpackage) in all RPM based distributions. For distributions based on RPM there are lots of helper commands available as well e.g for fedora, or RH based ones rpmdevtools package has lot of useful scripts/commands.

If you are looking for a builder, Fedora project uses a builder koji. It is hosted in fedorahosted.org. You can set up koji server and use command line tools for koji to build RPMs. Builder may not entirely solve your problem, but in case you have some free time, have a look.

share|improve this answer
    
I already use rpmbuild as the 'compiler' I use to 'compile' RPMs using the SPEC file (and relevant source code for the binaries) as 'source code'. I am asking for a tool which can coordinate that process. – djhaskin987 Oct 24 '12 at 15:28
    
@djhaskin987 Your question was bit confusing earlier. It didn't mention that you need something to coordinate and something on top of rpmbuild. rpmbuild isn't a compiler. It is a tool which uses spec file to generate rpms. It uses spec files and compilers specified in environment or spec file to compile source (assuming it is required - depends on spec file). – useratuniv Oct 24 '12 at 15:56
1  
If you are looking for a builder, Fedora project uses a builder koji. It is hosted in fedorahosted.org. You can set up koji server and use command line tools for koji to build RPMs. Builder may not entirely solve your problem, but in case you have some free time, have a look. – useratuniv Oct 24 '12 at 15:59
    
Thank you for your feedback. I will edit the question. If you turn your comment into an answer, I will at least vote it up. – djhaskin987 Oct 25 '12 at 15:21
    
@djhaskin987 I have updated the answers. – useratuniv Oct 25 '12 at 15:24

I've used scons to build RPM and Debian packages, so integrated tools as Package is worst and have minimal function that not enougth. Based my expirience i've recommend you create build script on bash or python or other scripting language and call it from scons using custom Action to call script with subprocess and set dependency from binaries/libraries/other artifacts that required for package with Depends function to this Command.

Of course, it applicable if you use scons as build system, otherwise ignore.

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I guess it's probably that you cannot find the result RPMs. The default should be at <YOUR_RPMBUILD_DIR>/RPMS/<ARCH>

Depending on your architecture. the ARCH maybe in either x86_64, i586, or noarch.

You can have following ~/.rpmmacros

%home %(echo $HOME)
%packager NAME OF PACKAGER
%vendor NAME OF VENDER
%_topdir ${home}/rpmbuild

Otherwise, you just need a Makefile like the following to compile, build, pack a tarball, and produce RPMs.

SRCS = LIST OF SOURCE FILES
DATA = LIST OF DATA FILES TO BE PACKED
BINARY = LIST OF FILES AS RESULT OF BUILD
TARBALL = FILENAME_OF_THE_SOURCE_ARCHIVE

all: rpm

rpm: build pack
   rpmbuild -ba <PATH_TO_SPEC>

pack: TARBALL

TARBALL: BINARY DATA
    COMMAND TO PACK TARBALL

build: BINARY

BINARY: SRCS
   BUILD COMMANDS
share|improve this answer
    
I already use rpmbuild as the 'compiler' I use to 'compile' RPMs using the SPEC file (and relevant source code for the binaries) as 'source code'. I am asking for a tool which can coordinate that process – djhaskin987 Jul 2 '14 at 17:02
    
I'm not exactly sure your workflow. Looks like you need to handle version (ChangeLogs perhaps) and file list. Brady's answer is a good start then. – Ding-Yi Chen Jul 4 '14 at 5:03

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