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I'm trying to find a way to pretty print a JavaScript data structure in a human-readable form for debugging.

I have a rather big and complicated data structure being stored in JS and I need to write some code to manipulate it. In order to work out what I'm doing and where I'm going wrong, what I really need is to be able to see the data structure in its entirety, and update it whenever I make changes through the UI.

All of this stuff I can handle myself, apart from finding a nice way to dump a JavaScript data structure to a human-readable string. JSON would do, but it really needs to be nicely formatted and indented. I'd usually use Firebug's excellent DOM dumping stuff for this, but I really need to be able to see the entire structure at once, which doesn't seem to be possible in Firebug.

Any suggestions are welcome.

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Not sure if you are notified of edits of answers. So I write this comment to inform you that I added my own version of indented dump. :-) –  PhiLho Sep 26 '08 at 9:18
    
Note: The JSON.stringify() answer seems to be quite useful, though it's not accepted as 'the' answer. –  GuruM Feb 7 '13 at 12:35
    
You could get a visual and intuitive output of objects using nodedump: github.com/ragamufin/nodedump –  ragamufin Oct 3 '13 at 23:44

15 Answers 15

up vote 15 down vote accepted

I wrote a function to dump a JS object in a readable form, although the output isn't indented, but it shouldn't be too hard to add that: I made this function from one I made for Lua (which is much more complex) which handled this indentation issue.

Here is the "simple" version:

function DumpObject(obj)
{
  var od = new Object;
  var result = "";
  var len = 0;

  for (var property in obj)
  {
    var value = obj[property];
    if (typeof value == 'string')
      value = "'" + value + "'";
    else if (typeof value == 'object')
    {
      if (value instanceof Array)
      {
        value = "[ " + value + " ]";
      }
      else
      {
        var ood = DumpObject(value);
        value = "{ " + ood.dump + " }";
      }
    }
    result += "'" + property + "' : " + value + ", ";
    len++;
  }
  od.dump = result.replace(/, $/, "");
  od.len = len;

  return od;
}

I will look at improving it a bit.
Note 1: To use it, do od = DumpObject(something) and use od.dump. Convoluted because I wanted the len value too (number of items) for another purpose. It is trivial to make the function return only the string.
Note 2: it doesn't handle loops in references.

EDIT

I made the indented version.

function DumpObjectIndented(obj, indent)
{
  var result = "";
  if (indent == null) indent = "";

  for (var property in obj)
  {
    var value = obj[property];
    if (typeof value == 'string')
      value = "'" + value + "'";
    else if (typeof value == 'object')
    {
      if (value instanceof Array)
      {
        // Just let JS convert the Array to a string!
        value = "[ " + value + " ]";
      }
      else
      {
        // Recursive dump
        // (replace "  " by "\t" or something else if you prefer)
        var od = DumpObjectIndented(value, indent + "  ");
        // If you like { on the same line as the key
        //value = "{\n" + od + "\n" + indent + "}";
        // If you prefer { and } to be aligned
        value = "\n" + indent + "{\n" + od + "\n" + indent + "}";
      }
    }
    result += indent + "'" + property + "' : " + value + ",\n";
  }
  return result.replace(/,\n$/, "");
}

Choose your indentation on the line with the recursive call, and you brace style by switching the commented line after this one.

... I see you whipped up your own version, which is good. Visitors will have a choice.

share|improve this answer
1  
I like ;) Can't get it to work properly, but if you don't mind, I'm going to shamelessly steal the concept and write my own :) –  Dan Sep 24 '08 at 23:29
2  
One short coming of this approach (compared with the JSON.stringify method Jason suggests) is that it does not show arrays of objects properly. When you have an array of objects it shows up as [object Object]. –  Ryan Mar 12 '10 at 17:58
    
@Ryan: You mean browser's native objects? Yes, looking back at my code, I saw I added a comment: // Too bad if one field is an object... :-P OK for my test here ... It is OK to dump user made structures. I see there are alternatives below, if you need something more robust. –  PhiLho Mar 13 '10 at 9:39
    
I cannot use this. I get infinite loop when I try to dump some json data. –  neoneye Aug 12 '11 at 14:42
1  
@RaphaelDDL & PhiLho - The Maximum call stack size could also be triggered on a small object; one with a property reference to itself. Such a reference would cause an infinite loop with this function. –  skibulk Dec 11 '13 at 14:38

For those looking for an awesome way to see your object, check prettyPrint.js

Creates a table with configurable view options to be printed somewhere on your doc. Better to look than in the console.

var tbl = prettyPrint( myObject, { /* options such as maxDepth, etc. */ });
document.body.appendChild(tbl);

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

A simple one for printing the elements as strings:

var s = "";
var len = array.length;
var lenMinus1 = len - 1
for (var i = 0; i < len; i++) {
   s += array[i];
   if(i < lenMinus1)  {
      s += ", ";
   }
}
alert(s);
share|improve this answer

I'd have a look at this one. Its source is available, so it wouldn't be hard to script it for more convenient use.

share|improve this answer
    
That's a pretty-printer for JS code, not data. You could get it to work on data if you ran it through JSON.stringify first to convert it to JS source code, but passing the indentation parameter JSON.stringify is substantially easier. –  Kragen Javier Sitaker Mar 9 '11 at 1:28

For Node.js, use:

util.inspect(object, [options]);

API Documentation

share|improve this answer

Lots of people writing code in this thread, with many comments about various gotchas. I liked this solution because it seemed complete and was a single file with no dependencies.

browser

nodejs

It worked "out of the box" and has both node and browser versions (presumably just different wrappers but I didn't dig to confirm).

The library also supports pretty printing XML, SQL and CSS, but I haven't tried those features.

share|improve this answer

I'm programming in Rhino and I wasn't satisfied with any of the answers that were posted here. So I've written my own pretty printer:

function pp(object, depth, embedded) { 
  typeof(depth) == "number" || (depth = 0)
  typeof(embedded) == "boolean" || (embedded = false)
  var newline = false
  var spacer = function(depth) { var spaces = ""; for (var i=0;i<depth;i++) { spaces += "  "}; return spaces }
  var pretty = ""
  if (      typeof(object) == "undefined" ) { pretty += "undefined" }
  else if ( typeof(object) == "boolean" || 
            typeof(object) == "number" ) {    pretty += object.toString() } 
  else if ( typeof(object) == "string" ) {    pretty += "\"" + object + "\"" } 
  else if (        object  == null) {         pretty += "null" } 
  else if ( object instanceof(Array) ) {
    if ( object.length > 0 ) {
      if (embedded) { newline = true }
      var content = ""
      for each (var item in object) { content += pp(item, depth+1) + ",\n" + spacer(depth+1) }
      content = content.replace(/,\n\s*$/, "").replace(/^\s*/,"")
      pretty += "[ " + content + "\n" + spacer(depth) + "]"
    } else { pretty += "[]" }
  } 
  else if (typeof(object) == "object") {
    if ( Object.keys(object).length > 0 ){
      if (embedded) { newline = true }
      var content = ""
      for (var key in object) { 
        content += spacer(depth + 1) + key.toString() + ": " + pp(object[key], depth+2, true) + ",\n" 
      }
      content = content.replace(/,\n\s*$/, "").replace(/^\s*/,"")
      pretty += "{ " + content + "\n" + spacer(depth) + "}"
    } else { pretty += "{}"}
  }
  else { pretty += object.toString() }
  return ((newline ? "\n" + spacer(depth) : "") + pretty)
}

The output looks like this:

js> pp({foo:"bar", baz: 1})
{ foo: "bar",
  baz: 1
}
js> var taco
js> pp({foo:"bar", baz: [1,"taco",{"blarg": "moo", "mine": "craft"}, null, taco, {}], bleep: {a:null, b:taco, c: []}})
{ foo: "bar",
  baz: 
    [ 1,
      "taco",
      { blarg: "moo",
        mine: "craft"
      },
      null,
      undefined,
      {}
    ],
  bleep: 
    { a: null,
      b: undefined,
      c: []
    }
}

I've also posted it as a Gist here for whatever future changes may be required.

share|improve this answer
7  
It might be a pretty printer but the code doesn't actually look very pretty :) –  Xion Aug 19 '11 at 9:22

You can use the following

<pre id="dump"></pre>
<script>
   var dump = JSON.stringify(sampleJsonObject, null, 4); 
   $('#dump').html(dump)
</script>
share|improve this answer

In Firebug, if you just console.debug ("%o", my_object) you can click on it in the console and enter an interactive object explorer. It shows the entire object, and lets you expand nested objects.

share|improve this answer
    
Problem with that is it only shows the 'topmost' object - i've got dozens of nested objects, and I really need to be able to see the entire contents at once, and importantly, see where things are changing. So Firebug really isn't working for me in this case. –  Dan Sep 24 '08 at 22:50
    
(yes I know you can click to expand them, but clicking 10 or so links every time I want to dump the data is what I'm doing now - very slow progress) –  Dan Sep 24 '08 at 22:51
1  
This also works in Chrome (and therefore presumably in Safari). –  Kragen Javier Sitaker Mar 9 '11 at 1:17

Use Crockford's JSON.stringify like this:

var myArray = ['e', {pluribus: 'unum'}];
var text = JSON.stringify(myArray, null, '\t'); //you can specify a number instead of '\t' and that many spaces will be used for indentation...

Variable text would look like this:

[
  "e",
   {
      "pluribus": "unum"
   }
]

By the way, this requires nothing more than that JS file - it will work with any library, etc.

share|improve this answer
2  
This is almost definitely the best answer you're going to get. I have taught 4 or 5 non-programmers to read and edit JSON.stringified data structures and use them extensively for configuration files. –  Joel Anair Sep 24 '08 at 23:19
1  
Weird that it would cause problems - it does introduce the name "JSON" to the global namespace, so that may cause you problems. Check your namespace for "JSON" before adding this to see if a collision exists. –  Jason Bunting Sep 24 '08 at 23:26
1  
Well, prototype is evil like that... ;) –  Jason Bunting Sep 24 '08 at 23:48
3  
An update on this, with Firefox 3.5 and above, JSON.stringify is built-in. (developer.mozilla.org/En/Using_JSON_in_Firefox), so if you are just trying to see a JSON object for debugging purposes, you can do it with no extra JS dependencies. –  Greg Bernhardt Feb 4 '11 at 19:45
1  
Also in Chrome. However, JSON.stringify fails on circular data JSON.stringify((function(){var x = []; x.push(x); return x})()) and on many other kinds of objects JSON.stringify(/foo/). –  Kragen Javier Sitaker Mar 9 '11 at 1:16

I thought J. Buntings response on using JSON.stringify was good as well. A an aside, you can use JSON.stringify via YUIs JSON object if you happen to be using YUI. In my case I needed to dump to HTML so it was easier to just tweak/cut/paste PhiLho response.

function dumpObject(obj, indent) 
{
  var CR = "<br />", SPC = "&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;", result = "";
  if (indent == null) indent = "";

  for (var property in obj)
  {
    var value = obj[property];

    if (typeof value == 'string')
    {
      value = "'" + value + "'";
    }
    else if (typeof value == 'object')
    {
      if (value instanceof Array)
      {
        // Just let JS convert the Array to a string!
        value = "[ " + value + " ]";
      }
      else
      {
        var od = dumpObject(value, indent + SPC);
        value = CR + indent + "{" + CR + od + CR + indent + "}";
      }
    }
    result += indent + "'" + property + "' : " + value + "," + CR;
  }
  return result;
}
share|improve this answer

jsDump

jsDump.parse([
    window,
    document,
    { a : 5, '1' : 'foo' },
    /^[ab]+$/g,
    new RegExp('x(.*?)z','ig'),
    alert, 
    function fn( x, y, z ){
        return x + y; 
    },
    true,
    undefined,
    null,
    new Date(),
    document.body,
    document.getElementById('links')
])

becomes

[
   [Window],
   [Document],
   {
      "1": "foo",
      "a": 5
   },
   /^[ab]+$/g,
   /x(.*?)z/gi,
   function alert( a ){
      [code]
   },
   function fn( a, b, c ){
      [code]
   },
   true,
   undefined,
   null,
   "Fri Feb 19 2010 00:49:45 GMT+0300 (MSK)",
   <body id="body" class="node"></body>,
   <div id="links">
]

QUnit (Unit-testing framework used by jQuery) using slightly patched version of jsDump.


JSON.stringify() is not best choice on some cases.

JSON.stringify({f:function(){}}) // "{}"
JSON.stringify(document.body)    // TypeError: Converting circular structure to JSON
share|improve this answer

This is really just a comment on Jason Bunting's "Use Crockford's JSON.stringify", but I wasn't able to add a comment to that answer.

As noted in the comments, JSON.stringify doesn't play well with the Prototype (www.prototypejs.org) library. However, it is fairly easy to make them play well together by temporarily removing the Array.prototype.toJSON method that prototype adds, run Crockford's stringify(), then put it back like this:

  var temp = Array.prototype.toJSON;
  delete Array.prototype.toJSON;
  $('result').value += JSON.stringify(profile_base, null, 2);
  Array.prototype.toJSON = temp;
share|improve this answer

Taking PhiLho's lead (thanks very much :)), I ended up writing my own as I couldn't quite get his to do what I wanted. It's pretty rough and ready, but it does the job I need. Thank you all for the excellent suggestions.

It's not brilliant code, I know, but for what it's worth, here it is. Someone might find it useful:

// Usage: dump(object)
function dump(object, pad){
    var indent = '\t'
    if (!pad) pad = ''
    var out = ''
    if (object.constructor == Array){
        out += '[\n'
        for (var i=0; i<object.length; i++){
            out += pad + indent + dump(object[i], pad + indent) + '\n'
        }
        out += pad + ']'
    }else if (object.constructor == Object){
        out += '{\n'
        for (var i in object){
            out += pad + indent + i + ': ' + dump(object[i], pad + indent) + '\n'
        }
        out += pad + '}'
    }else{
        out += object
    }
    return out
}
share|improve this answer
    
By the way, even though you can, you shouldn't end lines without a semicolon. Also, the standard way of doing __ if (!pad) pad = '' __ would be: __ pad = (pad || '') __ –  Jason Bunting Sep 24 '08 at 23:42
    
I take your point on if (!foo) foo = ... vs foo = (foo || ...), but what's the rationale for ending all lines with semicolons? –  Dan Sep 24 '08 at 23:44
    
You will run into some nasty idiosyncrasies of the language if you don't, not to mention you will be unable to easily minify your code (unless the minifier you happen to use is nice enough to stick semicolons in for you). See stackoverflow.com/questions/42247 for more details. –  Jason Bunting Sep 24 '08 at 23:51
1  
if (!pad) pad = ''; is cheaper, more flexible & more readable than pad = (pad || ''); albeit by a minute amount. If you insist on that form, remove the extraneous parenthesis. pad = pad || ''; 3 reasons for semicolons: JS auto-inserts end-line semicolons when it sees that omitting them would throw an error. 1) This is perforce a teeny bit slower than adding it yourself, and 2) can lead to errors when the next line happens not to throw an error when combined. 3) will prevent your code from being minified. –  SamGoody May 12 '10 at 7:18

flexjson includes a prettyPrint() function that might give you what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
It's.. Java? Hmm, not ideal, but I'll have a look, cheers. –  Dan Sep 24 '08 at 22:53

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