Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am attempting to return a list of widgets from an N-tree data structure. In my unit test, if i have roughly about 2000 widgets each with a single dependency, i'll encounter a stack overflow. What I think is happening is the for loop is causing my tree traversal to not be tail recursive. what's a better way of writing this in scala? Here's my function:

protected def getWidgetTree(key: String) : ListBuffer[Widget] = {
  def traverseTree(accumulator: ListBuffer[Widget], current: Widget) : ListBuffer[Widget] = {
    accumulator.append(current)

    if (!current.hasDependencies) {
      accumulator
    }  else {
      for (dependencyKey <- current.dependencies) {
        if (accumulator.findIndexOf(_.name == dependencyKey) == -1) {
          traverseTree(accumulator, getWidget(dependencyKey))
        }
      }

      accumulator
    }
  }

  traverseTree(ListBuffer[Widget](), getWidget(key))
}
share|improve this question
    
Could you please post Widget class together with test case –  Petro Semeniuk Oct 23 '12 at 23:27
    
Here you go Petro: case class Widget(name: String, dependencies: List[String]) –  Donuts Oct 24 '12 at 20:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The reason it's not tail-recursive is that you are making multiple recursive calls inside your function. To be tail-recursive, a recursive call can only be the last expression in the function body. After all, the whole point is that it works like a while-loop (and, thus, can be transformed into a loop). A loop can't call itself multiple times within a single iteration.

To do a tree traversal like this, you can use a queue to carry forward the nodes that need to be visited.

Assume we have this tree:

//        1
//       / \  
//      2   5
//     / \
//    3   4

Represented with this simple data structure:

case class Widget(name: String, dependencies: List[String]) {
  def hasDependencies = dependencies.nonEmpty
}

And we have this map pointing to each node:

val getWidget = List(
  Widget("1", List("2", "5")),
  Widget("2", List("3", "4")),
  Widget("3", List()),
  Widget("4", List()),
  Widget("5", List()))
  .map { w => w.name -> w }.toMap

Now we can rewrite your method to be tail-recursive:

def getWidgetTree(key: String): List[Widget] = {
  @tailrec
  def traverseTree(queue: List[String], accumulator: List[Widget]): List[Widget] = {
    queue match {
      case currentKey :: queueTail =>        // the queue is not empty
        val current = getWidget(currentKey)  // get the element at the front
        val newQueueItems =                  // filter out the dependencies already known
          current.dependencies.filterNot(dependencyKey => 
            accumulator.exists(_.name == dependencyKey) && !queue.contains(dependencyKey))
        traverseTree(newQueueItems ::: queueTail, current :: accumulator) // 
      case Nil =>                            // the queue is empty
        accumulator.reverse                  // we're done
    }
  }

  traverseTree(key :: Nil, List[Widget]())
}

And test it out:

for (k <- 1 to 5)
  println(getWidgetTree(k.toString).map(_.name))

prints:

ListBuffer(1, 2, 3, 4, 5)
ListBuffer(2, 3, 4)
ListBuffer(3)
ListBuffer(4)
ListBuffer(5)
share|improve this answer
    
the line "accumulator.exists(_.name == dependencyKey)" can tend to slow things down a bit when you add thousands of elements. What can I do to improve that lookup? –  Donuts Oct 24 '12 at 21:21
    
@John, keep all the keys from the accumulator in a cache (a Set would work) and check that. This is certainly better than traversing the accumulator. –  dhg Oct 24 '12 at 21:47
    
I added a mutable HashSet argument as a "keyAccumulator" to traverseTree which i now check instead of the Widget accumulator, and that boosted performance significantly. perhaps i could boost it even further if i index each string and just use integers throughout the process. –  Donuts Oct 24 '12 at 22:04

For the same example as in @dhg's answer, an equivalent tail recursive function with no mutable state (the ListBuffer) would be:

case class Widget(name: String, dependencies: List[String])

val getWidget = List(
  Widget("1", List("2", "5")),
  Widget("2", List("3", "4")),
  Widget("3", List()),
  Widget("4", List()),
  Widget("5", List())).map { w => w.name -> w }.toMap

def getWidgetTree(key: String): List[Widget] = {
  def addIfNotAlreadyContained(widgetList: List[Widget], widgetNameToAdd: String): List[Widget] = {
    if (widgetList.find(_.name == widgetNameToAdd).isDefined) widgetList
    else                                                      widgetList :+ getWidget(widgetNameToAdd)
  }

  @tailrec
  def traverseTree(currentWidgets: List[Widget], acc: List[Widget]): List[Widget] = currentWidgets match {
    case Nil                                => {
      // If there are no more widgets in this branch return what we've traversed so far
      acc 
    }
    case Widget(name, Nil) :: rest          => {
      // If the first widget is a leaf traverse the rest and add the leaf to the list of traversed
      traverseTree(rest, addIfNotAlreadyContained(acc, name)) 
    }
    case Widget(name, dependencies) :: rest => {
      // If the first widget is a parent, traverse it's children and the rest and add it to the list of traversed
      traverseTree(dependencies.map(getWidget) ++ rest, addIfNotAlreadyContained(acc, name))
    } 
  }

  val root = getWidget(key)
  traverseTree(root.dependencies.map(getWidget) :+ root, List[Widget]())
}

For the same test case

for (k <- 1 to 5)
  println(getWidgetTree(k.toString).map(_.name).toList.sorted)

Gives you:

List(2, 3, 4, 5, 1)
List(3, 4, 2)
List(3)
List(4)
List(5)

Note that this is postorder not preorder traversal.

share|improve this answer

Awesome! thanks. I didn't know about the @tailrec annotation. that's a pretty cool little gem there. I had to tweak the solution just a little bit because a widget with a self reference was resulting in in an endless loop. also newQueueItems was an Iterable when the call to traverseTree was expecting a List, so i had to toList that bit.

def getWidgetTree(key: String): List[Widget] = {
  @tailrec
  def traverseTree(queue: List[String], accumulator: List[Widget]): List[Widget] = {
    queue match {
      case currentKey :: queueTail =>        // the queue is not empty
        val current = getWidget(currentKey)  // get the element at the front
        val newQueueItems =                  // filter out the dependencies already known
          current.dependencies.filter(dependencyKey =>
            !accumulator.exists(_.name == dependencyKey) && !queue.contains(dependencyKey)).toList
        traverseTree(newQueueItems ::: queueTail, current :: accumulator) //
      case Nil =>                            // the queue is empty
        accumulator.reverse                  // we're done
    }
  }

  traverseTree(key :: Nil, List[Widget]())
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.