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what i basicly want is this:

public class Test 
{    
   private static final Integer a;

   public Test(Integer a) 
   {
      this.a = a;
   }

}

This obviously doesn't work, cause the 2nd created instance would try to override the final variable. So is there a way to give all the instances the same immutable value via the constructor?

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It's static final, so it's created once for all time and never changeable. Why is the constructor a reasonable place for this? (If it's due to a desire to lazily evaluate it, you may have make it non-final and rely on its private access control to prevent abuse.) –  Jeremy Roman Oct 23 '12 at 23:06
    
It's in the constructor cause the value depends on a config file value, but shouldn't be changed once it is set. –  Biene Maja Oct 23 '12 at 23:10
    
It sounds like you should just make the field not static. –  Ricky Clarkson Oct 23 '12 at 23:15
1  
If it's a global config setting (not specific to an instance), it should be set by a static initializer or static method, not the constructor. If it's an instance-specific setting, it should not be static (just final). –  Jeremy Roman Oct 23 '12 at 23:22
    
@RickyClarkson But wouldn't that be "wrong" or a memory waste, cause every instance will have the same variable with the same value instead of one variable for every instance? –  Biene Maja Oct 23 '12 at 23:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Static final values should be initialized in a static context, not by instances.

One options is to set the value in the declaration:

private static final Integer a=FileConfig.getInstance().getA();

Each class can have a static {} block where code is called to initialize the static parts of the class.

static {
    a = FileConfig.getInstance().getA();
}

Finally, you can set the value from a static method

private static int getA() {
    return FileConfig.getInstance().getA();
}

private static final Integer a=getA();

In closure, static instance initialization does not belong in instance constructors.

If the configuration values change sometimes, there is simply no reason to store the value a in a static final variable. If you want to create each instance with the constant a in the constructor, what is the purpose of a static field in the first place? Somehow, when you call the constructor for the first time, you are passing in a value from somewhere. If the value deserves to be static and final, you can acquire it from within the static initializer. If the configuration is not a singleton, but every instance always produces the same value of a, you could easily do a = new FileConfig().getA();.

Other than that, you could make the value non-final, and rest assured that since you always put in the same value of a, the static variable will not change.

Still, you could make a a final instance variable of the class, set in the constructor.

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But the value isn't known at compilation time, it comes from a class that reads a config-file, thus i need a way to pass it to the Test class. –  Biene Maja Oct 24 '12 at 0:01
    
Why not have the static method simply ask for the value from the config file reading class? It should be available at start-up, and the static initialization method will happily block while the config reader class loads its values. I edited my examples. –  Bailey S Oct 24 '12 at 0:12
    
The class which reads the configfiles isn't a singleton nor have static fields / methods, so sadly this isn't a solution :( –  Biene Maja Oct 24 '12 at 0:24
    
If the configuration values change sometimes, there is simply no reason to store the value a in a static final variable. If you want to create each instance with the constant a in the constructor, what is the purpose of a static field? Somehow, when you call the constructor for the first time, you are passing in a value from somewhere. If the value deserves to be static and final, you can acquire it from within the static initializer. If the configuration is not a singleton, but every instance always produces the same value of a, you could easily do a = new FileConfig().getA();. –  Bailey S Oct 24 '12 at 0:48
    
I basicly have an Arraylist of configFile objects (every file maps to a different type of object). Every configFile has a different "A" value. So there is no FileConfig().getA() but an ArrayList of FileConfig Instances with different values for "A". 1 ConfigFile belongs to many objects (all objects of a certain type). A Test instance is only created by a certain object type thus they all have the same "A" value and so there is no need for the Test class to have one "A" per instance. –  Biene Maja Oct 24 '12 at 1:20

So is there a way to give all the instances the same immutable value via the constructor?

I assume you want a value to be assigned to a the first time an object of type Test is created but not when any subsequent instance is created. In that case you cannot declare it final. a will be null initially, the constructor has to check if it is null and assign it a value in that case.

But I urge you to look at the design, especially why the caller have to provide the value. Isn't it counter-intuitive that after the second Test object is created Test.a does not change in the following case?

// assume this is the first `Test` object created:
Test t = new Test(5); // Test.a is 5
Test t = new Test(6); // Test.a is *still* 5
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