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I open a text report inside my Perl script and need to find the specific lines and store them in arrays.

this is my report which I need to process through:
matched pattern 1 
line1:10
line2:20
line3:30

next matched pattern 2
line1:5
line2:10
line3:15

next matched pattern 3
lineA:A
lineB:B
lineC:C
.
.
------------------------------------

this part is my script:

@numbers;
@numbers2;
@letters;
while (<FILE>)
{
 if ($_ =~/matched pattern 1/ && $_ ne "\n")
 {
   chomp();
   push (@numbers,$_)
 }
 if ($_ =~/next matched pattern 2/ && $_ ne "\n")
 {
   chomp();
   push (@numbers2,$_)
 }
 if ($_ =~/next matched pattern 3/ && $_ ne "\n")
 {
   chomp();
   push (@letters,$_)
 }
}

then I can use numbers and letters inside the arrays. this is a part of my report file

Maximum points per Lab
Lab1:10
Lab2:30
Lab3:20


Maximum points per Exam
Exam1:50
Exam2:50

Maximum points on Final
Final:150
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What is your program supposed to be doing? Your current program is looking for the lines that have matched pattern and storing THOSE VERY LINEs into three different arrays. All other lines are ignored.

You show some sort of example output, but there's no real relationship between your output and input.

First, learn about references, so you don't need five different arrays. In my example, I use an array of arrays to store all of your separate files. If each file represents something else, you could use an array of hashes or a hash of arrays or a hash of hashes of arrays to represent this data in a unified structure. (Don't get me started on how you really should learn object oriented Perl. Get the hang of references first).

Also get a book on modern Perl and learn the new Perl syntax. It looks like your Perl reference is for Perl 4.0. Perl 5.0 has been out since 1994. There's a big difference between Perl 4 and Perl 5 in the way syntax is done.

use strict;
use warnings;

# Prints out your data strtucture
use Data::Dumper;

my $array_num;
my @array_of_arrays;

use constant  {
    PATTERN => qr/matched pattern/,
};

while (my $line = <DATA>) {
    chomp $line;
    next if $line =~ /^\s*$/;   #Skip blank lines
    if ($line =~ PATTERN) {
        if (not defined $array_num) {
            $array_num = 0;
        }
        else {
            $array_num++;
        }
        next;
    }
    push @{ $array_of_arrays[$array_num] }, $line;
}
print Dumper (\@array_of_arrays) . "\n";

__DATA__
matched pattern 1 
line1:10
line2:20
line3:30

next matched pattern 2
line1:5
line2:10
line3:15

next matched pattern 3
lineA:A
lineB:B
lineC:C

OUTPUT. Each set of lines are in a different array:

$VAR1 = [
      [
        'line1:10',
        'line2:20',
        'line3:30'
      ],
      [
        'line1:5',
        'line2:10',
        'line3:15'
      ],
      [
        'lineA:A',
        'lineB:B',
        'lineC:C'
      ]
    ];
share|improve this answer
    
awsome. worked.nice –  femchi Oct 24 '12 at 3:58

Revised for some best practices and my own style preferences (programmed for extensibility, as I always end up extending code, so I try to program in a generally extensible way):

# Things we search for
my %patterns = (
    foo => qr/^matched pattern 1/,
    bar => qr/^matched pattern 2/,
    baz => qr/^matched pattern 3/,
);

# Where we store matches, initialized to empty array refs
my %matches = map { $_ => [] } keys %patterns;

open(my $fh, '<', $file) or die $!;
my %current_match;
LINE: while (my $line = <$fh>) {
    # We never want empty lines, so exit early
    next if $_ eq "\n";

    # Check current line for matches, to note which bucket we are saving into
    for my $matchable (keys %patterns) {
        # Skip to next unless it matches
        next unless $lines =~ $matches{$matchable};

        # Set the current match and jump to next line:
        $current_match = $matchable;
        next LINE;
    }

    # If there's a current match found, save the line
    push( @{$matches{$current_match}, $line ) if $current_match;
}
share|improve this answer
    
wow such a high level answer. I'm too amateur :D –  femchi Oct 24 '12 at 0:54
1  
It uses a few concepts you may not be familiar with, but spending a few minutes figuring out what's going on will probably help quite a bit in any future stuff you do in perl. Feel free to ask about anything specific you don't get. :) –  kbenson Oct 24 '12 at 0:55
    
thanks man. I try figuring it out. –  femchi Oct 24 '12 at 0:57
    
Err, also, I didn't actually test it runs, but conceptually it should work. If there's a problem, let me know. –  kbenson Oct 24 '12 at 1:01
@numbers;
@letters;
open FILE, "report2.txt" or die $!;
while (<FILE>)
{
 if ($_ =~/:(\d+)/ && $_ ne "\n")
 {
   chomp();
   push (@numbers,$1)
 }elsif ($_ =~/:(\w+)/ && $_ ne "\n")
 {
   chomp();
   push (@letters,$1)
 }
}

print "numbers:  ", @numbers, "\n";
print "letters:  ", @letters, "\n";
share|improve this answer
    
I need to manage 5 arrays and they are pretty same except in the title, I will edit the question –  femchi Oct 24 '12 at 0:17
    
@femchi I don't see a difference between patterns 1 and 2. Is there something that distinguishes them? –  David Oct 24 '12 at 0:31
    
when I use "while" it checks the file line by line and in my report after finding the matching pattern I need to put the next 3 lines in an array. –  femchi Oct 24 '12 at 0:40
    
I added a part of my report paper. –  femchi Oct 24 '12 at 0:45

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