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I'm running into problem about redirect stdout of multi process.

Assuming I have process A, I use fork() in A and then I get process A and B. And I use fork() in B, finally I get process A, B and C. Both B and C are implementing other program by exec().

Now, I try to redirect the stdout of A and B to stdin of C with two pipes.

#include<unistd.h>
#include<stdio.h>
#include<sty/types.h>
int main()
{
    int AtoC [2];
    pipe(AtoC);

    int fd1,fd2;
    fd1=fork();
    if(fd1>0)
    {
        /***In process A, I do the following steps: ***/
        close(AtoC[0]);
        dup2(AtoC[1], STDOUT_FILENO);
        /* program running in process A */
    }
    else
    {
        int BtoC [2];
        pipe(BtoC);
        fd2=fork();
        if(fd2>0)
        {
            /***In process B, I do the following steps: ***/
            close(AtoC[1]);
            close(BtoC[0]);
            dup2(BtoC[1], STDOUT_FILENO);
            /*** execute another program in process B using execl(); ***/
        }
        else
        {
            /*** In process C, I do the following steps: ***/
            close(AtoC[1]);
            close(BtoC[1]);
            dup2(AtoC[0],STDIN_FILENO);
            dup2(BtoC[0],STDIN_FILENO);
            /*** execute another different program in process C using execl(); ***/
        }
    }
}

Now, after these two statements :

dup2(AtoC[0],STDIN_FILENO);
dup2(BtoC[0],STDIN_FILENO);

the stdin of process C is finally redirect to BtoC[0] ,which is the stdout of process B. And the stdout of process A is not passed into process C's stdin.

My question is whether there is any solution can let me redirect both process A and B's stdout into process C's stdin at the same time.

Another question is if I also want to print the stdout of process A in screen, what should I do? I know the command tee in command line. I try to use the corresponding function tee(int fd_in, int fd_out, size_t len, unsigned int flags)in process A, but I failed to print anything of stdout of process A.

Any suggestion is appreciated, thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Bad variable naming: Don't call the result of fork and fd1 (which sounds like file descriptor 1). It is returning a process id. And every syscall can fail: fork can return -1 and set errno –  Basile Starynkevitch Oct 24 '12 at 5:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'm not sure that it's a good idea, but it is perfectly feasible. The key observation is that you only need one pipe. Several processes (with a common parent) can write to a single pipe. However, only one file descriptor can be used as the standard input. In the original code, only one of the pipes was connected to C as its standard input (the others were still connected, but mainly because you hadn't closed enough descriptors).

  • Rule of thumb: if you connect one end of a pipe to standard input or standard output via dup2() (or dup()), you should close both of the file descriptors returned by pipe().

Try this code for size. I've reduced the bushiness of the tree, removed unused variables (nothing uses the process IDs returned by fork()), renamed the pipe, made sure it is closed properly in each process, and provided some writing activity in processes A and B and some reading activity in process C in lieu of running commands. I'm assuming that usleep() (micro-sleep, sleep time expressed in microseconds) is available; if not, try nanosleep(), but it has a more complex interface).

#include <unistd.h>

int main(void)
{
    int ABtoC[2];
    pipe(ABtoC);

    if (fork() > 0)
    {
        // Process A
        close(ABtoC[0]);
        dup2(ABtoC[1], STDOUT_FILENO);
        close(ABtoC[1]);     // Close this too!
        // Process A writing to C
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            write(STDOUT_FILENO, "Hi\n", sizeof("Hi\n")-1);
            usleep(5000);
        }
    }
    else if (fork() > 0)
    {
        // Process B
        close(ABtoC[0]);
        dup2(ABtoC[1], STDOUT_FILENO);
        close(ABtoC[1]);
        // Process B writing to C
        for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
        {
            write(STDOUT_FILENO, "Lo\n", sizeof("Lo\n")-1);
            usleep(5000);
        }
    }
    else
    {
        char buffer[100];
        ssize_t nbytes;
        close(ABtoC[1]);
        dup2(ABtoC[0], STDIN_FILENO);
        close(ABtoC[0]);
        // Process C reading from both A and B
        while ((nbytes = read(STDIN_FILENO, buffer, sizeof(buffer))) > 0)
            write(STDOUT_FILENO, buffer, nbytes);
    }
    return(0);
}

The tail end of a run on my Mac (Mac OS X 10.7.5, GCC 4.7.1) produced:

Lo
Hi
Lo
Hi
Lo
Hi
Lo
Hi
Lo
Hi
Hi
Lo
Lo
Hi
Hi
Lo
Hi
Lo
Hi
Lo
Hi
Lo
Hi
Lo
Lo
Hi
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! I modified my code and understand the principle of sharing pipe thoroughly. @Jonathan Leffler –  Takumar Oct 26 '12 at 15:02

Following up on pipe sharing, you might want to checkout is-it-safe-to-pipe-the-output-of-several-parallel-processes. Works no problem for small writes, but for big ones data can get interleaved =)

share|improve this answer

how to redirect two output pipe ends to one input pipe end.

I don't know how it works, either and waits for other answers to the op. However, alternatively, you can use epoll-like asynchronous I/O. Process A need not block on the output of Process B/C. Process A read when data available.

I failed to print anything of stdout of process A.

The man page has a good example how to use tee, just for your reference.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, thanks all the same. I'll wait to see if other guys can give some more hints@Summer_More_More_Tea –  Takumar Oct 24 '12 at 2:30
    
@Takumar NP, you're always welcome.:) –  Summer_More_More_Tea Oct 24 '12 at 6:18

It is not possible. The whole idea about pipe is that it has 2 ends - one is attached to your process, say process A, and another belongs to another process, say C. If some other process wants to create another pipe, it must also have 2 ends, and it is not possible for 2 ends to end in one hole.

When you did this:

dup2(AtoC[0],STDIN_FILENO);
dup2(BtoC[0],STDIN_FILENO);

second line effectively overrode first one. dup2(oldfd, newfd) is supposed to close newfd and make it effectively the same as oldfd. So, first line plugs it in, but second line unplugs it and plugs in something different.

share|improve this answer
1  
I agree with your analysis of why the two dup2() calls are wrong. I don't agree with your opening statement. As my answer demonstrates, it is possible. –  Jonathan Leffler Oct 24 '12 at 23:59

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