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Is there a way to find if a a particular Oracle index was ever used by Oracle when executing a query?

We have a function based index, which I suspect is not getting used by Oracle and hence some queries are running slow. How could I find out if any query run against the database is using this query?

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Are you asking if one specific query uses the index, or if there are any queries that ever use the index? –  Jon Heller Oct 24 '12 at 5:29
    
Yes...I was asking if there were any queries at all that used a particular index. The answer below by Robert seems to be a right fit :-) –  Guddu Oct 24 '12 at 21:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

If the question is : if there are any queries that ever use the index?

ALTER INDEX myindex MONITORING USAGE;

Wait a few days/months/years:

SELECT *
FROM   v$object_usage
WHERE index_name = 'MYINDEX';

http://docs.oracle.com/cd/B28359_01/server.111/b28310/indexes004.htm#i1006905

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Thanks Robert...That helps :-) –  Guddu Oct 24 '12 at 21:05

If you're using some sort of IDE (e.g. Oracle's SQL Developer, PL/SQL Developer from Allround Automations, Toad, etc) each one of them has some way to dump the plan for a statement - poke around in the menus and the on-line help.

If you can get into SQL*Plus (try typing "sql" at your friendly command line) you can turn autotrace on, execute your statement, and the plan should be printed. As in

SQL> set autotrace on
SQL> select * from dept where deptno = 40;
    DEPTNO DNAME          LOC
---------- -------------- -------------
        40 OPERATIONS     BOSTON

Execution Plan
----------------------------------------------------------
   0      SELECT STATEMENT Optimizer=CHOOSE (Cost=1 Card=1 Bytes=18)
   1    0   TABLE ACCESS (BY INDEX ROWID) OF 'DEPT' (Cost=1 Card=1 Bytes=18)
   2    1     INDEX (UNIQUE SCAN) OF 'PK_DEPT' (UNIQUE)

Statistics
----------------------------------------------------------
          0  recursive calls
          0  db block gets
          2  consistent gets
          0  physical reads
          0  redo size
        499  bytes sent via SQL*Net to client
        503  bytes received via SQL*Net from client
          2  SQL*Net roundtrips to/from client
          0  sorts (memory)
          0  sorts (disk)
          1  rows processed

This assumes that your friendly neighborhood DBA has performed the necessary incantations to enable this feature. If this hasn't been done, or you just want One More Way (tm) to do this, try something like the following, substituting the query you care about:

SQL> EXPLAIN PLAN FOR select * from dept where deptno = 40;
Explained.

SQL> set linesize 132

SQL> SELECT * FROM TABLE( dbms_xplan.display);

PLAN_TABLE_OUTPUT
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Plan hash value: 2852011669

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Id  | Operation                   | Name    | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)| Time     |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT            |         |     1 |    20 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|   1 |  TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| DEPT    |     1 |    20 |     1   (0)| 00:00:01 |
|*  2 |   INDEX UNIQUE SCAN         | PK_DEPT |     1 |       |     0   (0)| 00:00:01 |
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   2 - access("DEPTNO"=40)

14 rows selected.

Share and enjoy.

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Thanks Bob...My question was little different though but this information was still useful. –  Guddu Oct 24 '12 at 21:05

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