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Pretty self explanatory code. Why doesn't it work!

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    __asm__("number dw 0"); // declare number?
    printf("%d",number);
    __asm__("mov %eax,number"
            "inc %eax"
            "mov number,%eax");
    printf("%d",number);
    return 0;
}

cc     ex1.c   -o ex1
ex1.c: In function ‘main’:
ex1.c:22:17: error: ‘number’ undeclared (first use in this function)
ex1.c:22:17: note: each undeclared identifier is reported only once for each function it appears in
make: *** [ex1] Error 1

Thanks.

I have a lot of knowledge gaps to fill... the gcc manual was confusing me with regards to inline assembly as was google results for tutorials...

working on an intel i7 processor

share|improve this question
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Use this syntax, you can access variables declared in C from the inline assembly

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int number = 0;
    printf("%d\n",number);
    asm(
        "mov %[number],%%eax\n"
        "inc %%eax\n"
        "mov %%eax,%[number]\n"
        : [number] "=m" (number) : "m" (number) : "eax", "cc" );
    printf("%d\n",number);
    return 0;
}

You can let the compiler load number into the eax register for you by specifying the "a" constraint on the input

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int number = 0;
    printf("%d\n",number);
    asm(
        "inc %%eax\n"
        "mov %%eax,%[number]\n"
        : [number] "=m" (number) : "a" (number) : "cc" );
    printf("%d\n",number);
    return 0;
}

And since x86 inc instruction can operate on memory directly you could reduce it to this

#include <stdio.h>

int main() {
    int number = 0;
    printf("%d\n",number);
    asm(
        "incl %[number]\n" /* incl -> "long" (32-bits) */
        : [number] "=m" (number) : "m" (number) : "cc" );
    printf("%d\n",number);
    return 0;
}

For more information see gcc documentation:

6.41 Assembler Instructions with C Expression Operands

share|improve this answer
    
As number is both input and output, it must be listed as both, otherwise the compiler might not generate the expected code. Also in this case the memory clobber is not needed since the only thing changed is listed as output. However, while not required, it is good practice to list cc clobber.Generally the proper constraints should be used instead of moving stuff around manually. If you want something in eax use "a" and let the compiler load/store it. As a rule of thumb, always use the most generic constraints so that the compiler has more possibilities during inlining. – Jester Oct 25 '12 at 1:28
    
Forgot to mention that obviously eax must be listed as clobber too. Inline asm is complicated ;) – Jester Oct 25 '12 at 1:35
    
Thanks for your comments, I've edited the answer. – amdn Oct 25 '12 at 2:22

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