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I have the following attempt at an immutable object:

class MyObject
{
    private static int nextId;

    public MyObject()
    {
        _id = ++nextId;
    }

    private int _id;
    public int Id { get { return _id; } }
    public string Name { get; private set; }
}

Then, I try to use it like so:

MyObject o1 = new MyObject { Name = "foo" };

But the object initialiser fails because Name's setter is private. Is there a way around this, or do I have to choose between one or the other?

share|improve this question
    
I updated my answer to include my version of the builder pattern. Hope it helps. –  Bryan Watts Aug 21 '09 at 7:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You can't use object initializers with immutable objects. They require settable properties.

An immutable object implies "does not change after creation". Making Name a constructor parameter neatly expresses that principle.

If the object gets too complicated for a comprehensible constructor, you can also use the Builder pattern. Generally, the builder itself will have mutable properties (that you can use in object initializers), and its .Build() method will create the actual instance.

EDIT (OP): I'm going to add my own example of a builder that I cooked up here, then accept this answer since it proposes a reasonable solution.

class MyObject
{
    public class Builder
    {
        public Builder()
        {
            // set default values
            Name = String.Empty;
        }

        public MyObject Build()
        {
            return new MyObject(Name);
        }
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }

    private static int nextId;

    protected MyObject(string name)
    {
        Id = ++nextId;
        Name = name;
    }

    public int Id { get; private set; }
    public string Name { get; private set; }
}

You can then construct an instance of it with the following:

MyObject test = new MyObject.Builder { Name = "foo" }.Build();

EDIT: This is my take on the pattern:

public abstract class Builder<T>
{
    public static implicit operator T(Builder<T> builder)
    {
        return builder.Build();
    }

    private bool _built;

    public T Build()
    {
        if(_built)
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException("Instance already built");
        }

        _built = true;

        return GetInstance();
    }

    protected abstract T GetInstance();
}

Here is your example as implemented with Builder<T>. It takes advantage of the scoping rules of nested types to access the private setter:

public class MyObject
{
    private static int nextId;

    protected MyObject()
    {
        Id = ++nextId;
    }

    public int Id { get; private set; }

    public string Name { get; private set; }

    public sealed class Builder : Builder<MyObject>
    {
        private MyObject _instance = new MyObject();

        protected override MyObject GetInstance()
        {
            // Validate properties here

            return _instance;
        }

        public string Name
        {
            get { return _instance.Name; }
            set { _instance.Name = value; }
        }
    }
}

It has an implicit conversion to the target type, allowing you to do this:

MyObject myObject = new MyObject.Builder { Name = "Some name" };

Or this:

public void Foo(MyObject myObject)

// ...

Foo(new MyObject.Builder { Name = "Some name" });
share|improve this answer
    
Added an example, hope you don't mind. Let me know if I did it wrong (fingers crossed). –  Matthew Scharley Aug 20 '09 at 6:21
    
Given that I have about 20 properties, I think this is the way I'll go. –  Matthew Scharley Aug 20 '09 at 7:34
    
As usual, someone experienced has some better ideas than my own. If I could give you another +1 for the implicit conversion operator, I would. –  Matthew Scharley Aug 21 '09 at 7:50

You need to set the property in the constructor, and you don't need a separate local variable for the id:

class MyObject {

   private static int nextId = 0;

   public MyObject(string name) {
      Id = ++nextId;
      Name = name;
   }

   public int Id { get; private set; }
   public string Name { get; private set; }
}

Creation:

MyObject o1 = new MyObject("foo");
share|improve this answer

You cannot use object initializers and have an immutable object, as object initializers require the property setters to be public. Public setters mean it will not be immutable.

The only way around that would be to simulate immutability, by throwing exceptions in the property setter after they have already been called once.

Personally I don't think that would be a good design, and I would question why you are so keen on using object initializers, instead of constructors. The syntax is almost identical.

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1  
Almost identical, but among other things, object initialisers allow for fully optional constructor parameters, something we won't actually get till C# 4.0 with it's optional and named parameters (finally!) –  Matthew Scharley Aug 20 '09 at 5:50
    
Strictly speaking, thats not true. They don't allow for optional consuctor parameters at all, they just use a syntax that is similar in appearance to a constructor. –  Ch00k Aug 20 '09 at 22:13

Make the setter public or create a constructor overload to set the Property Name.

class MyObject{

    public MyObject(string name) {
        Name = name;
    }

    public string Name { get; private set; }
}

The call

MyObject o1 = new MyObject { Name = "foo" };

is equivalent to

MyObject o1 = new MyObject();
o1.Name = "foo"; //This doesn´t work, cause the setter is private.

To make it really immutable create a field for the property Name and make it readonly. So the Property Name can only be set using the constructor and it cannot be changed during runtime.

class MyObject{

    private readonly string _name;

    public MyObject(string name) {
        _name = name;
    }

    public string Name { 
      get { return _name; }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
The first option means it's no longer immutable. The second means I can't use object initialisers. Does this mean I do have choose one way or the other? –  Matthew Scharley Aug 20 '09 at 5:42
2  
Yes, the object initialiser is "compiler magic" to shorten the way how to create a object and to set some of its properties –  Jehof Aug 20 '09 at 5:45
    
These are just data storage objects. There won't be any actual methods on them beyond the constructor(s) –  Matthew Scharley Aug 20 '09 at 5:57
    
@Matthew , I think you are confusing Constructors and Initializers being same, they are not, they are totally different. Initializers are just another way of writing code, Initializer executes outside scope of class, so it can never access private members. –  Akash Kava Aug 20 '09 at 5:57
1  
@Jehof: You don't mean "local variable". –  Jon Skeet Aug 20 '09 at 6:04

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